HELP with Coop location and conditions!

KodaBlue

Chirping
Jul 28, 2018
40
82
84
Hello fellow flock keepers!

I am coming here to get some opinions and TWO main questions regarding the coop I'm going to build.

First is location, I have just moved to the outskirts of town and I am now able to have chickens again! So my 1st question is the only space I can have my coop is under this very big and very beautiful deciduous tree but there are apples everywhere! We have about 15 apple trees on the property amongst pear, cherry, plum, and choke cherry. But for the run it would be surrounded by apple trees and I know the seeds contain cyanide and can be toxic to chickens in large quantities. And I would just like to know some ideas what I can do about that. I will trim branches as to not let so many fall into the enclosed run. But I will also be letting them free range. Would i just have to do heavy clean up as the apples fall? And i will be refraining from moving them because here in North Dakota it is very rare to have such an established and old set of trees around the property for those in Nodak you will understand but all in all there are some pictures to kinda get the idea of what is going on. The run is going to be 35'×45' forgive the mess as we have just ran power and a water line to the garden and where the coop is going to be eventually. The coop will be on that small concrete slab that use to be an old rundown garden shed.

Second question is wintering the coop. Living in North Dakota the weather can be brutal with highs being 15°F and lows being -20°F and wind chill can reach -35° (FREAKING COLD!) and I was wondering what method I should take for bedding/coverage of the coop. Maybe the deep litter method? What materials should I use? Shavings? Sand? I really dont want to use straw as it can get cakey and just down right Nasty. I use to live in Washington state and the climate is very temperate compared to the Bipolar Dakota's. Any help Information and ideas would much much appreciated.

Ty to all who help!
Ry.
 

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Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,685
21,336
907
Southeast Louisiana
My main concern in locating a coop and run is drainage. A wet coop and run is a danger, a dry one is much better. You are in a totally different climate than you were so different things can work, but good drainage is still important. Building the coop on a slab will help a lot but don't forget the run.

All this misinformation about things being dangerous for your chickens makes you wonder why they never became extinct. Yes there is cyanide in apple seeds and many other fruit seeds. Maybe enough cyanide to kill an insect small enough to bore into an apple seed. Certainly not enough to harm your chickens. It's all about dosage. If an apple falls into the run they will be eating apple much more than seeds. They will not be able to eat enough apple seeds to get enough cyanide to harm themselves.

Read this article. his climate is colder than yours.

Alaskan’s Article

https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/cold-weather-poultry-housing-and-care.72010/
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
97,705
133,984
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,685
21,336
907
Southeast Louisiana
Alaskan's article, the one I linked above, has a long section on the pros and cons of insulation. That is experience-based information from having insulated and not-insulated coops. If you haven't I recommend you read it before you decide whether or not to insulate.
 

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