Hen limping, foot swollen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Layira, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. Layira

    Layira Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I noticed my red leghorn hen was limping this morning and looking at her foot, it seemed swollen. Moreso on the back toe (don't know the technical name for it sorry), but her foot in general seemed pretty swollen too. I'm not sure if she stepped on something or what, but she doesn't want to put weight on it. I'm worried it's infected.

    I separated her from the rest of the flock but that's it so far. She's a year old and acting normally as of now. But because I freerange them I'm considering the possibility that she injured herself on something around the farm.

    Any ideas about what I should do? And what it could be?

    Please help!
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2011
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Check the bottom of the foot for a dark scab, the sign of bumblefoot; lots of threads about that on here. Any raised leg scales? You could try a Betadine or Epson salt soak, and / or smearing it with Neosporin.
     
  3. Layira

    Layira Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Ok, so no dark scab. And it doesn't look like any of her scales are lifted. The back toe is swollen up, and pinkish(?) in color. It doesn't feel particularly hot. I'm gonna get a pic.
     
  4. Layira

    Layira Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    here's a pic. It's her right foot. I didn't wash it off yet so her foot is still pretty dirty.
     
  5. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, it's pink, and you said "not particularly hot" so I'm guessing it's warmer than the good foot. It does look like there is a dark scab there, just not on the bottom of the foot. I think I'd still go with assuming there is infection, do a dilute Betadine soak, smear Neosporin, etc.

    I'm certainly no vet, and this is guesswork, of course.
     
  6. Layira

    Layira Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Warmer, yeah, but definitely not burning hot. when I cleaned off her foot, it looked like that dark spot was maybe dirt under the scales of her foot that caused the top to swell up. It seemed to partially scrub away, but it was difficult to tell.

    Ok, thank you. So far I soaked it in Epsom salt and warm water, then cleaned it with an iodine solution (that's the same thing, right?) and then put some bacitracin on it.

    She still was limping, which I expected. How long do you think I'd have to keep doing this to see any result?

    Any other suggestions, anyone?
     
  7. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, sorry, Betadine is an iodine based surgical scrub. I'd hate to try to guess on how long, but surely a few days to soak the crud out.

    I'm sure some would give a systemic antibiotic, probably penicillin. Not sure I would.
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    I see the swelling on top of the back toe. I'd treat this just like bumblefoot. After soaking, make a small cut into it with a sterile razor blade and squeeze the infection out, wear disposable plastic gloves. You are probably dealing with staph infection, squeeze it hard to get it all out...dont worry about the blood. Then soak it again in warm epsom salts water for about 15-20 minutes to draw more of the infection out. Repeat squeezing and soaking again. Then put either iodine or betadine on a gauze, fill the open wound with neosporin or triple antibiotic and place the soaked iodine or betadine gauze over the neosporin and wrap it up with a piece of vet wrap or duct tape. Repeat again in two days and wrap. Then the 4th day it should be healed. Let's hope the infection didnt get to the legbone, if it did, it will almost be impossible to save her. Once it gets to the legbone, it quickly spreads throughout their body, death is inevitable and no amount of antibiotics will stop it.
     
  9. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm so glad dawg chimed in. I'd do what he said.
     
  10. Layira

    Layira Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you flockwatcher!


    Quote:Ok, I believe this will work. Thank you for the help!!!
     

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