Hen pecked

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by JulieAGill, Jan 8, 2015.

  1. JulieAGill

    JulieAGill Out Of The Brooder

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    I have 5 chickens all about 5 months old. Three are one week younger than two. I noticed yesterday that one of them has a bald spot by her vent and a sore. Later in the evening I discovered that another one had a sore. I had already separated the one. I know one of them that has been pecking those two. Today, I checked the first one and saw that her sore looks a little bigger and yellow but like a scab and nothing seeping and more balding. I have been doing things in their coop for the last couple of hours in order to separate the two wounded ones from the rest. The second one I discovered has a couple sores.I put hydrogen peroxide on them both but no fizzing occurred. I also put triple antibiotic ointment on them both. I noticed hen #1 that has the more bare spots was either trying to get the medicine off her feathers or trying to pluck her own feathers. I also read that putting vicks on all of them would discourage the pecking. I bought what is literally called a pecker breaker (hanging treat for them to peck at). During the time I was with them after applying the vicks they seem to be leaving each other alone. Does anyone have any suggestions or comments that may be helpful. I am concerned about the wounds getting infected if the one isn't already.
     
  2. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

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    Hello there and welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    Sorry you are having troubles. Once chickens see skin, redness and blood, they keep pecking no matter what you put on them. I have even tried pine tar with no effects! You might try some Blu-kote. This is a spray you can get at the feed store. It is an antibacterial/antifungal spray that is purple. It not only helps to prevent infections but it hides all wounds and skin so they birds don't see it and generally won't peck at these areas. Always use gloves when spraying this stuff as it stains your hands and clothes. Reapply it if it wears off.

    They also make hen saddles if these areas are around the back of the chickens. These will protect any sores on the backs of the hens...http://www.hensaver.com/

    BUT...Make sure you have enough room for your birds. Cramped chickens chew on each other. 5 square feet per bird in the coop, 10 square feet per bird in the run. Get them outside every day for some exercise. This will do wonders for aggression! Even if you have to supervise them for 20 or 30 mins, but get them outside.

    Keep the on a good diet and limit the goodies. They need to eat their layer feed much of the day and treats will fill them up and they don't eat much.

    Sometimes caging a meanie works if you keep them isolated for a few weeks. Pinless peepers will stop aggression. I have had great success with these in the past. Stops feather plucking and aggression right in it's tracks but use these as last resort only if everything else fails. Never leave a bird in the coop with a raw sore. You may come out to a dead bird as they can peck her to death.

    Good luck with your birds and welcome to our flock!
     
  3. JulieAGill

    JulieAGill Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2014
    Hi TwoCrows,

    The two that were pecked at have wounds that have a yellow looking scab. I have actually put them both together in a big dog crate. The one who was doing most of the pecking laid our first egg about an hour ago. I'm concerned about the wounds on the two. Their coop is 6 feet by 7 feet. Their hen house house smaller of course. The pecking started sometime this week. Saturday they had a very traumatic time while my husband was cutting down a large limb from a tree right behind their coop with stuff falling on the roof and creating quite a loud noise. I was in the coop with them. So, I don't know if that's what started it or the egg. Would you recommend I get the blue kote stuff and will it help with the possibly infection. My husband thinks I should bring them in. Any suggestions?
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]We're glad to have you.
     
  5. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] Glad you joined us!
     
  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  7. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

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    It is always good to have some blu-kote on hand. You may not need it this time so you can use something else. But I like to use it because you can get the birds back in the flock quicker because the blu-kote hides the wounds. But you use your own discretion here. :)
     
  8. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC!
     
  9. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.

    X2 on Two Crows excellent advice.
     
  10. JulieAGill

    JulieAGill Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2014
    I'm concerned about the two with wounds because they have yellow scabs. They are separate from the others. We are going to expand their run and house by 5 feet this weekend and add roosting boxes. Can I get the blu-kote at a feed store?
     

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