Heritage Large Fowl - Phase II

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by juststruttin, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. MagicChicken

    MagicChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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  2. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    I can do that. I have generic vegetable oil and olive oil? Which one and how much?
    Thanks,
    karen
     
  3. Anna6

    Anna6 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am still undecided as to what breeds to get, heritage dual breed heavy, and if I should consider getting them local if possible or from an hatchery. I also have the option of incubating or using a brooder. Any input?
     
  4. Beekissed

    Beekissed Flock Master

    I'm doubting you will find any heritage blood line birds from a hatchery source~only heritage type breeds~ so you might focus on local breeders in your area for getting started on breeds you choose. It's a good idea to stick with breeds that do well in your climate so you aren't fighting an uphill battle from the beginning.
     
  5. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    I feed a warm mash every day, once it starts getting cold. I make mine very thick, roughly the consistency of very thick oatmeal. The main thing is to have it warm.

    If you have some cracked corn...that will help with heat-building in their systems.

    If you want to call me, I'll PM my phone number.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  6. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    Hi,
    Ok I added mil and olive oil. Now it is the consistency of thick, sticky cooked oatmeal. is that ok?
     
  7. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    I hope not too much oil...don't want to scour them. Give them some if you want but you might be better off to leve them on the roost until morning...early. JMHO
     
  8. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    we don't have roosts. they sleep in the chips. I added about 1/8 cup olive oil. Ok to feed that way?
    So right now the warm mash is 3 cups rolled oats, 3 cups milk, 2 cups white corn meal, 1/8 cup olive oil, 1 can canned spinach. It is a thick, gooey cooked oatmeal consistency. Does that sound about right to feed my Sussex?
    Thanks,
    Karen
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  9. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    What do you usually feed them?
     
  10. Beekissed

    Beekissed Flock Master

    I don't know what your goal is with the warm mash but whatever warmth if provides immediately will be fleeting and then they will be facing the cold temps the same as if they never had it. This info might help put your mind at ease about the temps. As long as they are receiving balanced nutrition, have shelter and are in reasonably good health, they should do just fine in the subzero temps we will be getting.

    Quote: Birds allowed free access to their environment also rely on behavioral thermoregulation. This means they will seek out the most energy efficient means of maintaining their body
    temperature such as feather ruffling, drinking water, moving into the shade or sun (or heat source), huddling and lying down.

    The major advantage of endothermy over ectothermy is decreased vulnerability to fluctuations in external temperature. Regardless of location (and hence external temperature), endothermy maintains a constant core temperature for optimum enzyme activity. Endotherms control body temperature by internal homeostatic mechanisms. In mammals two separate homeostatic mechanisms are involved in thermoregulation - one mechanism increases body temperature, while the other decreases it. The presence of two separate mechanisms provides a very high degree of control. This is important because the core temperature of mammals can be controlled to be as close as possible to the optimum temperature for enzyme activity.
     
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