Hippie Jims C&P's

Discussion in 'Games, Jokes, and Fun!' started by the1much, Oct 4, 2008.

  1. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    The Pickle Jar

    The pickle jar as far back as I can remember sat on the floor beside the dresser in my parents' bedroom. When he got ready for bed, Dad would empty his pockets and toss his coins into the jar.


    As a small boy I was always fascinated at the sounds the coins made as they were dropped into the jar . They landed with a merry jingle when the jar was almost empty. Then the tones gradually muted to a dull thud as the jar was filled.


    I used to squat on the floor in front of the jar and admire the copper and silver circles that glinted like a pirate's treasure when the sun poured through the bedroom window. When the jar was filled, Dad would sit at the kitchen table and roll the coins before taking them to the bank.


    Taking the coins to the bank was always a big production Stacked neatly in a small cardboard box, the coins were placed between Dad and me on the seat of his old truck.


    Each and every time, as we drove to the bank, Dad would look at me hopefully. 'Those coins are going to keep you out of the textile mill, son. You're going to do better than me. This old mill town's not going to hold you back.'


    Also, each and every time, as he slid the box of rolled coins across the counter at the bank toward the cashier, he would grin proudly 'These are for my son's college fund. He'll never work at the mill all his life like me.'


    We would always celebrate each deposit by stopping for an ice cream cone. I always got chocolate. Dad always got vanilla. When the clerk at the ice cream parlor handed Dad his change, he would show me the few coins nestled in his palm. 'When we get home, we'll start filling the jar again.'

    He always let me drop the first coins into the empty jar.

    As they rattled around with a brief, happy jingle, we grinned at each other. 'You'll get to college on pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters,' he said. 'But you'll get there; I'll see to that.'


    No matter how rough things got at home, Dad continued to doggedly drop his coins into the jar. Even the summer when Dad got laid off from the mill, and Mama had to serve dried beans several times a week, not a single dime was taken from the jar.


    To the contrary, as Dad looked across the table at me, pouring catsup over my beans to make them more palatable, he became more determined than ever to make a way out for me. 'When you finish college, Son,' he told me, his eyes glistening, 'You'll never have to eat beans again - unless you want to.'


    The years passed, and I finished college and took a job in another town. Once, while visiting my parents, I used the phone in their bedroom, and noticed that the pickle jar was gone. It had served its purpose and had been removed.


    A lump rose in my throat as I stared at the spot beside the dresser where the jar had always stood. My dad was a man of few words, and never lectured me on the values of determination, perseverance, and faith.

    The pickle jar had taught me all these virtues far more eloquently than the most flowery of words could have done. When I married, I told my wife Susan about the significant part the lowly pickle jar had played in my life as a boy. In my mind, it defined, more than anything else, how much my dad had loved me.


    The first Christmas after our daughter Jessica was born, we spent the holiday with my parents. After dinner, Mom and Dad sat next to each other on the sofa, taking turns cuddling their first grandchild. Jessica began to whimper softly, and Susan took her from Dad's arms. 'She probably needs to be changed,' she said, carrying the baby into my parents' bedroom to diaper her. When Susan came back into the living room, there was a strange mist in her eyes.


    She handed Jessica back to Dad before taking my hand and leading me into the room. 'Look,' she said softly, her eyes directing me to a spot on the floor beside the dresser. To my amazement, there, as if it had never been removed, stood the old pickle jar, the bottom already covered with coins. I walked over to the pickle jar, dug down into my pocket, and pulled out a fistful of coins. With a gamut of emotions choking me, I dropped the coins into the jar. I looked up and saw that Dad, carrying Jessica, had slipped quietly into the room. Our eyes locked, and I knew he was feeling the same emotions I felt. Neither one of us could speak.


    This truly touched my heart. I know it has yours as well. Sometimes we are so busy adding up our troubles that we forget to count our blessings.


    Never underestimate the power of your actions. With one small gesture you can change a person's life, for better or for worse.


    God puts us all in each other's lives to impact one another in some way. Look for Good in others.


    The best and most beautiful things cannot be seen or touched - they must be felt with the heart ~ Helen Keller
     
  2. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Paul Harvey Writes:



    We tried so hard to make things better for our kids that we made them worse. For my grandchildren, I'd like better.

    I'd really like for them to know about hand me down clothes and homemade ice cream and leftover meat loaf sandwiches. I really would.



    I hope you learn humility by being humiliated, and that you learn honesty by being cheated.

    I hope you learn to make your own bed and mow the lawn and wash the car.
    And I really hope nobody gives you a brand new car when you are sixteen.



    It will be good if at least one time you can see puppies born and your old dog put to sleep.



    I hope you get a black eye fighting for something you believe in.



    I hope you have to share a bedroom with your younger brother/sister. And it's all right if you have to draw a line down the middle of the room,but when he wants to crawl under the covers with you because he's scared, I hope you let him.



    When you want to see a movie and your little brother/sister wants to tag along, I hope you'll let him/her.

    I hope you have to walk uphill to school with your friends and that you live in a town where you can do it safely.



    On rainy days when you have to catch a ride, I hope you don't ask your driver to drop you two blocks away so you won't be seen riding with someone as uncool as your Mom.



    If you want a slingshot, I hope your Dad teaches you how to make one instead of buying one.

    I hope you learn to dig in the dirt and read books.



    When you learn to use computers, I hope you also learn to add and subtract in your head.



    I hope you get teased by your friends when you have your first crush on a boy\\girl, and when you talk back to your mother that you learn what ivory soap tastes like.



    May you skin your knee climbing a mountain, burn your hand on a stove and stick your tongue on a frozen flagpole.



    I don't care if you try a beer once, but I hope you don't like it.. And if a friend offers you dope or a joint, I hope you realize he is not your friend.



    I sure hope you make time to sit on a porch with your Grandma/Grandpa and go fishing with your Uncle.



    May you feel sorrow at a funeral and joy during the holidays.



    I hope your mother punishes you when you throw a baseball through your neighbor's window and that she hugs you and kisses you at Hannukah/Christmas time when you give her a plaster mold of your hand.




    These things I wish for you - tough times and disappointment, hard work and happiness. To me, it's the only way to appreciate life
     
  3. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    RED MARBLES

    I was at the corner grocery store buying some early potatoes. I noticed a small boy, delicate of bone and feature, ragged but clean, hungrily apprising a basket of freshly picked green peas.


    I paid for my potatoes but was also drawn to the display of fresh green peas. I am a pushover for creamed peas and new potatoes.


    Pondering the peas, I couldn't help overhearing the conversation between Mr. Miller (the store owner) and the ragged boy next to me.


    'Hello Barry, how are you today?'


    'H'lo, Mr. Miller. Fine, thank ya. Jus' admirin' them peas. They sure look good.'


    'They are good, Barry. How's your Ma?'


    'Fine. Gittin' stronger alla' time.'


    'Good. Anything I can help you with?'


    'No, Sir. Jus' admirin' them peas.'


    'Would you like to take some home?' asked Mr. Miller.

    'No, Sir. Got nuthin' to pay for 'em with.'

    'Well, what have you to trade me for some of those peas?'

    'All I got's my prize marble here.'

    'Is that right? Let me see it' said Miller.

    'Here 'tis. She's a dandy.'

    'I can see that. Hmm mmm, only thing is this one is blue and I sort of go for red. Do you have a red one like this at home?' the store owner asked.

    'Not zackley but almost.'

    'Tell you what. Take this sack of peas home with you and next trip this way let me look at that red marble'. Mr. Miller told the boy.

    'Sure will. Thanks Mr. Miller.'

    Mrs. Miller, who had been standing nearby, came over to help me.

    With a smile she said, 'There are two other boys like him in our community, all three are in very poor circumstances. Jim just loves to bargain with them for peas, apples, tomatoes, or whatever. When they come back with their red marbles, and they always do, he decides he doesn't like red after all and he sends them home with a bag of produce for a green marble or an orange one, when they come on their next trip to the store.'



    I left the store smiling to myself, impressed with this man. A short tim e later I moved to Colorado , but I never forgot the story of this man, the boys, and their bartering for marbles.

    Several years went by, each more rapid than the previous one. Just recently I had occasion to visit some old friends in that Idaho community and while I was there learned that Mr. Miller had died. They were having his visitation that evening and knowing my friends wanted to go, I agreed to accompany them. Upon arrival at the mortuary we fell into line to meet the relatives of the deceased and to offer whatever words of comfort we could.

    Ahead of us in line were three young men. One was in an army uniform and the other two wore nice haircuts, dark suits and white shirts...all very professional looking. They approached Mrs. Miller, standing compo sed and smiling by her husband's casket. Each of the young men hugged her, kissed her on the cheek, spoke briefly with her and moved on to the casket.
    Her misty light blue eyes followed them as, one by one, each young man stopped briefly and placed his own warm hand over the cold pale hand in the casket. Each left the mortuary awkwardly, wiping his eyes.

    Our turn came to meet Mrs. Miller. I told her who I was and reminded her of the story from those many years ago and what she had told me about her husband's bartering for marbles. With her eyes glistening, she took my hand and led me to the casket.

    'Those three young men who just left were the boys I told you about.

    They just told me how they appreciated the things Jim 'traded' them. Now, at last, when Jim could not change his mind about color or size....they came to pay their debt.'


    'We've never had a great deal of the wealth of this world,' she confided, 'but right now, Jim would consider himself the richest man in Idaho .'

    With loving gentleness she lifted the lifeless fingers of her deceased husband. Resting underneath were three exquisitely shined red marbles.

    The Moral : We will not be remembered by our words, but by our kind deeds. Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath.

    Today I wish you a day of ordinary miracles ~ Afresh pot of coffee you
    didn't make yourself...An unexpected phone call from an old friend...Green stoplights on your way to work...The fastest line at the grocery store...A good sing-along song on the radio...Your keys found right where you left them.
     
  4. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Life is too short for
    drama & petty things.

    So laugh insanely,
    love truly
    and forgive quickly!

    From one unstable person to another...

    I hope everyone is happy in your head
    - we're all doin' pretty good
    in mine.
     
  5. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Iceland
    Amen Brother, Amen.
     
  6. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    A group of alumni, highly established in their careers, got together to visit their old university professor. Conversation soon turned into complaints about stress in work and life.

    Offering his guests coffee, the professor went to the kitchen and returned with a large pot of coffee and an assortment of cups - porcelain, plastic, glass, crystal, some plain looking, some expensive, some exquisite - telling them to help themselves to the coffee.

    When all the students had a cup of coffee in hand, the professor said: "If you noticed, all the nice looking expensive cups were taken up, leaving behind the plain and cheap ones. While it is normal for you to want only the best for yourselves, that is the source of your problems and stress. Be assured that the cup itself adds no quality to the coffee. In most cases it is just more expensive and in some cases even hides what we drink..

    What all of you really wanted was coffee, not the cup, but you consciously went for the best cups... And then you began eyeing each other's cups.

    Now consider this: Life is the coffee; the jobs, money and position in society are the cups. They are just tools to hold and contain Life, and the type of cup we have does not define, nor change the quality of LIFE we live. Sometimes, by concentrating only on the cup, we fail to enjoy the coffee has been provided us."
     
  7. cat

    cat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 9, 2008
    Thank you so much for your posts, I really needed reminding today of what is important. Much love to you and yours from me and mine in Ireland [​IMG]
     
  8. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Quote:Thank you VERY much ,,, it means alot to US [​IMG]
     
  9. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    If you will take the time to read these, I promise you'll come away with an enlightened perspective. The subjects covered affect us all on a daily basis:



    They're written by Andy Rooney , a man who has the gift of saying so much with so few words.



    Enjoy.......



    I've learned .. That the best classroom in the world is at the feet of an elderly person.



    I've learned .. That when you're in love, it shows.



    I've learned .. That just one person saying to me, 'You've made my day!' makes my day.



    I've learned .. That having a child fall asleep in your arms is one of the most peaceful feelings in the world.



    I've learned .. That being kind is more important than being right.



    I've learned .. That you should never say no to a gift from a child.



    I've learned .. That I can always pray for someone when I don't have the strength to help him in some other way.



    I've learned .. That no matter how serious your life requires you to be, everyone needs a friend to act goofy with.



    I've learned .. That sometimes all a person needs is a hand to hold and a heart to understand.



    I've learned .. That simple walks with my father around the block on summer nights when I was a child did wonders for me as an adult.



    I've learned .. That life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.



    I've learned .. That we should be glad God doesn't give us everything we ask for



    I've learned .. That money doesn't buy class.



    I've learned .. That it's those small daily happenings that make life so spectacular.



    I've learned .. That under everyone's hard shell is someone who wants to be appreciated and loved.



    I've learned .. That to ignore the facts does not change the facts.



    I've learned .. That when you plan to get even with someone, you are only letting that person continue to hurt you.



    I've learned .. That love, not time, heals all wounds.



    I've learned .. That the easiest way for me to grow as a person is to surround myself with people smarter than I am.



    I've learned .. That everyone you meet deserves to be greeted with a smile



    I've learned .. That no one is perfect until you fall in love with them.



    I've learned .. That life is tough, but I'm tougher.



    I've learned .. That opportunities are never lost; someone will take the ones you miss.



    I've learned .. That when you harbor bitterness, happiness will dock elsewhere



    I've learned .. That I wish I could have told my Mom that I love her one more time before she passed away.



    I've learned .. That one should keep his words both soft and tender, because tomorrow he may have to eat them.



    I've learned .. That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.



    I've learned .. That when your newly born grandchild holds your little finger in his little fist, that you're hooked for life.



    I've learned .. That everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it.



    I've learned .. That the less time I have to work with, the more things I get done.
     
  10. Chirpy

    Chirpy Balderdash

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    May 24, 2007
    Colorado
    Thanks for many words of wisdom... I wish more people would live by what's written above. [​IMG]

    Edited because my smilie got itself mixed into the middle of a word.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2008

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