theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
May 11, 2010
30,384
10,053
757


This is Cody's Miss Magnolia. She's performing a foxtrot that many foxtrotter breeders would give an arm and leg for. This no-nonsense AQHA mare ignored her reining bloodlines to become one of the finest endurance horses seen in her time. I remember at one competition, the Arab folks laughed at us. Miss Cody ambled along nonchalantly as if we had all the time in the world. Then the trail turned tough and all the Arabs were struggling in slick Georgia clay. Some horses were having panic attacks over the mud clinging to their hooves.These horses lost time, and when we finally arrived the trail was the worst slush you ever seen. I gave Miss Cody a pat on the neck and said: Time to get serious, Miss Cody. And she plowed through the slimy mess. All I had to do was keep my balance. We were covered in red mud when we arrived at the next check point. She passed the vet exam and we foxtrotted to victory. I've never been able to find another like her.
 

FlaRocky

Songster
8 Years
Sep 29, 2011
873
16
128
Sugarloaf Mt.Clermont, Florida


This is Cody's Miss Magnolia. She's performing a foxtrot that many foxtrotter breeders would give an arm and leg for. This no-nonsense AQHA mare ignored her reining bloodlines to become one of the finest endurance horses seen in her time. I remember at one competition, the Arab folks laughed at us. Miss Cody ambled along nonchalantly as if we had all the time in the world. Then the trail turned tough and all the Arabs were struggling in slick Georgia clay. Some horses were having panic attacks over the mud clinging to their hooves.These horses lost time, and when we finally arrived the trail was the worst slush you ever seen. I gave Miss Cody a pat on the neck and said: Time to get serious, Miss Cody. And she plowed through the slimy mess. All I had to do was keep my balance. We were covered in red mud when we arrived at the next check point. She passed the vet exam and we foxtrotted to victory. I've never been able to find another like her.
I just love those old-time single-footing QH's. Yes, it is in the bloodlines. A lot of people don't know that some of the old QH bloodlines had a shuffel-foot gait. Some of the old timer day-riders around here used them when I was a kid. Working 12 to 16 hours a day, of course they rode something that wouldn't sore the cowboy up too bad. I have now moved on to Rocky Mountain's, and yes some do work cattle. Love the smooth ride and big bone and hips of my RMH. You might want to check some of them out. Love your mare....:thumbup: Maye Ride the Glide......Got Gait.... I Do....
 

fallchick57

In the Brooder
8 Years
Dec 17, 2011
15
0
22
wE HAVE A COUPLE CANADIAN MORGAN/ PERCHORON CROSSES. tHEY YUSED TO DRIVE CARRIAGES, BUT NOW THEY'RE RETIRE , LIVING THE GOOD LIFE.
 

Rezia

Songster
7 Years
May 3, 2012
1,406
5
128
Apache Junction, AZ
If anyone is interested in a horse, I've got just the one for you! He's a papered and registered chocolate palomino QH. 12 years old, 14 or so hands high. Gets dapples in the winter! Pretty! The owner is selling him, because she doesn't have enough time to ride him. (He's hyper!) She has a new grandbaby, and is constantly visiting her. If anyone wants pictures, or wants to know the price, PM me!
 

Shyhalo

Hatching
7 Years
Mar 2, 2012
3
0
6

I have a Paint x Mustang .... He is three years old. Mostly white with one chestnut spot on each side. Also a partial Medicine hat.Both eyes are blue with eyeliner. Got him a year ago.
 

GhostRider65

Songster
8 Years
Mar 6, 2011
1,579
24
151
NE Wisconsin
Just some pictures of the brambies........
Tess is a registerd Appaloosa
15"3 and 1275 lbs, Jack is a Black Standardbred 16"2 and 1200 lbs, and Lia the fatty Welsh Half linger draft cross pony who is only only 12"2 but weighs in at 1000lbs....










Also had to add my Old man Appy Shadow who I lost in 09 to severe colic with complications........
 

henney penny

Songster
10 Years
Nov 21, 2009
1,733
35
221
Northern Maine
I have a question about heaves in a horse.My daughter has a horse that has this really bad,years ago I had a pony and my neighbor had a horse with this problem and and old times told us to put arsnic in an apple (just the tip of a knife worth) and feed it to them a few days on and a few days off.It completely cured the neighbors horse and helped the pony alot.My question is can you buy arsnic anywhere today?This was 40 years ago and it was bought in Canada as we live close to the border here.It was a old farier that told us about it.My daughter horse is so bad that they have to water down all his hay and she pays a lot for his hay to get it as dust free as possible.This is really hard to do in the winter as it leaves ice everywhere and very cold on the hads.He is on steroids and breath right but I know this works as I have seen it work.I thought maybe there would be some old timers on here that could answer my question.There was a newspaper article that my daughter found from 1913 about giveing arsnic to horses and that it did work
 
I am not sure that you can buy arsenic anymore. I've never tried, though. But I would definitely talk to a vet before you *treat* your horse with arsenic. I am a big fan of old time remedies, but would NEVER use one that involved feeding a poison.

I had a horse with heaves, also. She passed away back in the '90's, so I am not sure if things have changed in handling heaves. She grazed pasture without issue, but when she was stalled at night, she had soaked hay and/or soaked hay cubes/pellets. At the time, we lived in far northern NY, up near Lake Placid. Winter temps were horrendously cold. We found the easiest way to soak her hay was to put it in a haybag in a large bucket. Then it was simple to get it out of the water without getting our hands wet, you just held onto the dry part of the bag and snapped it up in the stall.

Also, we soaked pellets and cubes in warm/hot water. She always ate them before they froze....

Another thing we did was to minimize any dust when she was stalled. No dusty shavings, no sweeping of the barn alley if she was in the barn. She also had a stall closest to the door with the most ventilation.

Handling her in that manner didn't shorten her life - she was in her 30's when she passed...
 

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