How many people eat there chickens on this form

MrJesse34

In the Brooder
8 Years
May 27, 2011
31
0
22
Long Valley
I butchered my first chicken this weekend. I never really grew up around it. I was around chickens at my grandpas house but he never killed and ate any of his flock. Before I was born he did a little bit, but I guess he got a little soft in his old age.

Anyhow - I had a rooster that was about 8 months old. He was always very nice and docile. As soon as he became sexually mature, he was a terror. Attacking me in the coop, attacking others who come over to watch the chickens for the night, etc. If my chickens were in a free range environment then I would be fine with this behavior. But in a chicken coop its just undesirable and it was ruining my chicken owning experience. Plus, I personally felt that butchering a chicken would be a good skill to have done and to know how to do.

So this weekend, my wife's mom (go figure, right) was around on Saturday. When they got home from shopping we went out to the coop (after dark) and took the rooster. No squaking, no fighting me, just took him in his sleep. Carried him upside down to keep him calm. We dispatched him by slitting his throat and letting him bleed out - a surprisingly quick, quiet, and peaceful thing to me. Once the rooster was dead and bled out, we brought him inside to be cleaned.

I was a little sad at first, but once we got into cleaning the bird I focused on that. Removing the feathers was not hard but took a long time. I broke the chicken up into pieces and put it into the fridge for the past few days. I am planning on marinating it tonight and eating it for dinner tomorrow.

The whole thing for me, that made it easier was having someone around you who knows what they are doing. My MIL really helped me, guiding me, showing me how to do it right. Someone mentioned a few pages back about not wanting to do their first chicken for fear of "messing it up". That was honestly my biggest fear. He was a good rooster, doing what came instinctively to him, and I wanted to be sure I butchered him and used him in a way that respected and befitted his position as a living thing in my care. Yes, my chickens are considered pets at some level but there is also realism that any "good" pet owner or animal owner must understand. You have to have a level of responsibility to be honest enough with yourself in these situations. In my case, the right thing to do was to butcher, clean, and now eat the rooster to improve my flock and make the whole experience as a whole better.

I would equate butchering your first chicken to hunting - another thing I have yet to experience. Its not something you can just pick up a gun and go do - not safely or responsibly, anyway. And there are a ton of resources out there on hunting, safety, how to do things, etc. Just as there are with butchering. But there is just no substitute for learning from someone else. Both in hunting, and in butchering and cleaning your first chicken.
 

chicmom

Dances with Chickens
10 Years
Feb 24, 2009
8,696
262
316
Strasburg Ohio
I eat chickens, just not my own so far. I might try and raise some meat birds one of these days.....

I love chicken........Just made some BBQ chicken breasts under the broiler last night. Delicious. I like to use KC Masterpiece.....Simple, quick and delicious!
 

Stephanie739

Songster
8 Years
Oct 7, 2011
1,483
19
143

Quote:I can understand that to some degree. I have been raised around eating our animals our whole lives. To me chickens are not pets, they are livestock. I don't have a problem with processing animals, I used to when I was younger though. This past week my DH and I have processed 3 deer so no it doesn't bother me anymore. I don't have a problem killing animals whether by wringing their necks or shooting. My kids ages 4 and 2 now know that we eat our chickens, cows, and rabbits. They both watched us process the deer and have no problems with it.

As for chicken being inexpensive - I don't know where you live but here in the grocery it is expensive - $4-$5 a pound for Chicken breasts that haven't been frozen and pumped with chemicals. When you are feeding a family of 4 on about $150 a month for groceries you just can't afford that.

Yes there are terrible things that go on in this world, but you can't live your life not caring about yourself and what goes into your body. I try to be a self sufficient as possible, and am gaining more each day. For me we eat our chickens and other animals or starve. Simple as that, especially in the winter when we don't have fresh produce. I can and freeze as much as I can get my hands on, but with a family of 4 eating 3 meals a day at home - it is tough.

I would be willing to bet the majority that have an issue w/ eating their chickens have not had that experience


I'm a huge skeptic and do not believe the hype about the more expensive meats being raised healthier or in better conditions. I believe there are some loop holes that mean nothing to the actual conditions of the animals that some processors / raisers have jumped through so they can add the higher price to their meat. Like a friend of mine who worked for a cookie maker factory, she said they made the name brand cookies and the store brand at the same place just a different package.

I wasn't meaning that b/c of the horrible things in the world we shouldn't care, just that we have been conditioned our entire lives not to think about things.

My brother raised meat chickens, had them processed by a third party, and sold his chickens to whole food stores, farmers markets, and individual customers. People were paying A LOT of money for those chickens. I think $20 and $30 a bird was a common price! Wow, right? But they lived good lives: free range, no injections, etc...and the customers liked that. Of course poor people do not have the luxury of buying humanely treated birds, so they must raise them on their own.

If I can't eat my own chickens, I don't really deserve to eat chicken. That is how I feel about it. Of course, I don't really mind the vegetarian lifestyle anyway, but I am actually looking forward to the self sufficiency involved in raising poultry for meat (I want ducks) now)

This is a fantastic thread! Kudos to whomever started it.
 

Knock Kneed Hen

California Dream'in Chickens
9 Years
Feb 15, 2010
4,154
77
278
So. Cal.
While I haven't butchered a chicken myself, I did give one to friends for their dinner table because of the same reason mentioned below. I agree with this post 100%. Great description, shows compassion for a living creature, shows appreciation, received help the first time. . . eventually the time will come when a layer will have to be killed for one reason or another. I think it's inevitable that I'll have to know how to kill a bird.

Quote:
 

johnsons-r-us

Chirping
8 Years
Jul 18, 2011
362
2
99
Eudora, Kansas
Quote:Not necessarily. Depends on how you define "close". My dog is a companion animal. He's also a working animal (he just doesn't realize it
) His job is to hang around and discourage predators, and point, get up and fetch pheasants for us. He comes in when it's cold out and gets lots of petting and attention. I guess I'd consider that being "close" to my dog. No, I wouldn't eat him. Why? Because here in the US dogs aren't traditionally raised for meat. But what if I lived in a culture where they were? It's altogether possible that I would because it would be how I was raised. I would look at that dog as a source of food first, possibly a companion second. Hmm, something to consider, isn't it? In the US, chickens have been traditionally a source of food, whether for eggs or meat. Am I "close" to my chickens? I suppose. I feed them, I enjoy watching their antics, I care for them as best I can. Because I'm concerned about their safety, DH spent lots of time and money helping me (er, I helped HIM) build a good, sturdy coop and fairly secure run for when they're not freeranging. But because I've been raised in a culture where it's common to eat chickens, I don't have any qualms about it. I can't say that I "miss" them when they're gone, but that's because I usually have more to take their place. They are not a source of companionship for me. I don't pet them, they don't hang out at the house wtih me. They get fed, watered, let out in the morning and put back up at night. I don't get attached, so to speak, because I know I'm going to butcher them some day. If I raised my dog for the same purpose, I'd do like I do with my chickens - enjoy him while I've got him, knowing the day will come that he will die at my hand and provide sustinance for me in the form of meat.



X2


I wish I would have been around my grandparents who did process their chickens. But I was raised in the city where everything came from the store. I have no emotional attachment to my chickens, however, we know nothing of processing them and I would not venture to do it myself. We will find someone who will though. So one day I will eat my first home-grown chicken!

I can say being raised on store bought food it is hard for me to get used to the taste of home grown anything. Beef included. And when I can buy chickens for .69/lb at the store for the freezer my budget minded self has to be reminded that we do what we can with what we have. And food can be just as tasty or not depending on how you cook it. We can't all afford to go out and do the "organic" or "farm raised" thing when it is cost prohibited.
 

Johnn

Crowing
8 Years
Sep 5, 2011
8,670
646
346
Quote:


X2


I wish I would have been around my grandparents who did process their chickens. But I was raised in the city where everything came from the store. I have no emotional attachment to my chickens, however, we know nothing of processing them and I would not venture to do it myself. We will find someone who will though. So one day I will eat my first home-grown chicken!

I can say being raised on store bought food it is hard for me to get used to the taste of home grown anything. Beef included. And when I can buy chickens for .69/lb at the store for the freezer my budget minded self has to be reminded that we do what we can with what we have. And food can be just as tasty or not depending on how you cook it. We can't all afford to go out and do the "organic" or "farm raised" thing when it is cost prohibited.

well here in the UK we also dont eat dogs i cant imagine any one doing it although some do. To me it would be like eating my dog because it is also a pet
 

MrJesse34

In the Brooder
8 Years
May 27, 2011
31
0
22
Long Valley
Quote:
Thank you!! Its hard for some people to seperate the emotion of the act from the act itself. My mom, for example, when I told her yesterday.

Yes, its sad. Yes, it was a living creature. But it needed to be done, and was done in a respectful and technically correct manner.

I didn't just cut its head off, let it run around for a couple minutes, etc etc.

It was done correctly, with the correct tools to minimize any possible suffering and make sure the meat was in the best possible condition for when I cook it up.

And just to add - I even get sad when I kill and clean trout for the dinner table. A living thing is a living thing, regardless of intelligence, attitude, temprament, etc. This is also the reason I take bugs outside instead of killing them - whats the point? The bug wasn't doing anything wrong, doing what bugs do.
 
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ChickieBooBoo

Cold Canadian Chick
10 Years
Dec 2, 2009
28,316
31
374
Canada
I eat my own chickens, ducks and geese. I have pets but if I needed to I wouldn't have a problem doing them in aswell.
 
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