How much longer do I have to wait for my 1st egg

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Zwillingsmama, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. EggWalrus

    EggWalrus Crowing

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    Unless your timered light is on a dimmer also, and it gets dark at 4pm where you are, why not just set the timer to have light come on at 2am and go of after sunrise. They will still get 14 hours light, but they can see to go to bed by the setting sun, instead of stumbling around by being plunged into darkness with a light going off at 8.
     
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  2. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    Overall, hesitant to potentially have a crowing rooster at 2 am (or early 2,3,4 am hours) through the winter. I do have neighbors and don't particularly want to be the subject of complaints. In addition, I have a neighbor with a rooster that crows more often than ours. Their rooster, and ours respond to each other...so if mine crows, theirs might as well, and so on and so forth.

    Due to the natural light waning in the evening, the birds have been settled on their roosts before the light turns off.
     
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  3. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    This light is in their coop. Their run (50'x10') does have exterior lights, but these are purposefully turned on by us as needed and are not kept on.
     
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  4. Zwillingsmama

    Zwillingsmama Songster

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    Yes I think my Oe is a Legbar Welsummer mix. She is quite the character
     
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  5. An overhead bulb is best and everything considered an incandescent bulb is better yet.
    The most natural and easiest way to supplement the light is to put the bulb(s) on a timer and set them to come on before Sunrise and to stay on until two about two hours after Sunrise. This will give you the light your hens need to be productive and as an added benefit your birds will still enjoy a natural Sunset and stay primed to go to roost at the normal time, ie. Sundown. Just be sure that wherever you are that your birds enjoy at least 14 hours of light per day. North of the Equator the days get shorter AFTER June 20th and after December 20th the days begin to lengthen.

    The closer to the Equator you are the more abrupt the Sunrise and Sunset is. The further from the Equator you are the longer twilight lasts. Good luck.

    Oh, BTW, when a hen is getting closet to lay, her head and face will redden up nicely and her comb and face will begin to look like a very plump & ripe strawberry. You may want to Google the word "penial gland" or "melatonin" to learn more.
     
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  6. EggWalrus

    EggWalrus Crowing

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    Makes sense.
     
  7. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    Come and talk to my Dark Brown Leghorn girls and inform them that they should be laying!! <sigh> 36 weeks old, three DBL pullets, the only white (cream) layers in our flock....no eggs... Even our Black Jersey Giant has been laying for weeks. Of course, the head cockerel does not seem to like the DBLs and they are flighty, so not sure if they've ever been mated. I guess time will tell if they will lay...but since none of the three DBL's are laying it is not likely to be a defect, maybe stress since at least 2 of them are lowest on pecking order, but no blood, no obvious fights, and they can access food and water, also plenty of roost space.
     
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  8. Aceoky

    Aceoky Songster

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    I don't think supplemental light makes any difference on first year layers, maturity matters not how much light they are getting, older hens yes, first year pullets I really don't think so.
     
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  9. WVduckchick

    WVduckchick For The Birds!

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    Partially agree. I think the later they come to “maturity”, if the daylight hours are too low at that time, they may not start until spring. I had a group of 8 lavender orpingtons one fall, 2 laid thru the winter, the other 6 waited till spring. But I do have some new pullets starting to lay just this week.
     
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  10. EggWalrus

    EggWalrus Crowing

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    Lots of modern breeds of pullets will lay right thru their first winter, but there are those heirloom breeds that won't lay till the next spring if they were born after spring. I have some pullets that are nearly 10 months old and even with supplimental light, they aren't laying (even though they are red faced) and probably won't until they are certain the weather is right for having babies.
    It's just how chickens have managed to survive for millions of years without human interference.
    Sometimes they know better than we do.
    :old
     

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