I have a breeding question ? This may sound dumb but bare with me I am new to chikens.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by HeMcgill, Sep 20, 2013.

  1. HeMcgill

    HeMcgill Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 20, 2013
    I have Americana Hens and Cinnomen Queens and I have a Bantam Rooster. I also Have a little bantam Hen that went Broody, So she hatched out five of the eight eggs, and these babies are 2 mths old now but I wanted to know if breeding chickens is like breeding dogs, If I am using a Bantam Rooster with Those hens which are Reg sz, then will they be mixed breeds or does anyone know if they will be Bantam sz or reg or is this all up in the air, I have been told that the Rooster doesnt matter. However that doesnt make since to me so I am just wondering as far a genetics what role does the rooster play. Also I have been told only the baby chicks which are Rooster will have the Dads genes?
     
  2. unique

    unique New Egg

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    If you breed a small chicken with a regular size chicken the baby's will be smaller. They will grow faster but will not get as big as the mom. Unlike dogs it's only with that batch the next time she starts mating you can breed her with a regular size chicken and get a regular size chick. There is no blood line like dogs.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Anything with a mother and a father get half their genes from each parent. Breeding two different breeds together gives you mixed breed birds. Breeding a large bird with a bantam will give you mid-sized birds. Both sexes get half their genes from each parent.

    now, as you get farther along, there are some genes/colors that are linked to gender, but I don't think that's what you're talking about here.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2013
  4. write2caroline

    write2caroline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, just like dogs they take dna from the hen and the roo and your babies, will all carry bantam genes within them from the bantam roo if he is the only one to breed with the hens. Your chicks may be smaller not tiny but smaller or not because of how the gene pool sorts itself out. Bantams were bred with standards to bantamize certain standard breeds so what you are going to get it a modge podge of interesting possibilities you might here called yard mutts.

    The standard chickens eggs are still standard size so the chicks may not be much smaller.

    Post pictures please, they will be very interesting to see.

    Caroline
     
  5. Totalcolour

    Totalcolour Chillin' With My Peeps

    That's nonsense. Every animal that uses sexual reproduction gets most of it's genes half and half, for THAT MATING ONLY. The offspring will be half from one parent and half from the other (except for the sex-linked genes).

    So, if you breed your Lab with a poodle, the pups will be labradoodles , but only for that breeding. Successive breeding will depend on th[edited to correct typo omission]e next sire, same with chickens.

    So, if you switch out the bantam papa with a LF, then after some weeks (hens can remain fertile for several weeks after the cock bird is removed) the new chicks will have the same genetics as the new roo! (Same as with dogs).
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2013
  6. FridayYet

    FridayYet Innocent Bystander

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  7. Totalcolour

    Totalcolour Chillin' With My Peeps

     
  8. HeMcgill

    HeMcgill Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much for ur responses and I will get some pics of the babies they are two mths old and I think they are all Americana with the Bantam as the daddy, only one cinn queen hatched out but a dadgum opposum got it the other day. But will get some pics bc I have no idea how to tell a hen from a roo with these lil chicks
     

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