I think my betta fish is dying :-( UPDATE

Chickerdoodle13

The truth is out there...
12 Years
Mar 5, 2007
6,820
389
331
Phoenix, AZ
I guess I used the wrong term! They are like sponge "bubblers". They just put air bubbles into the tank. Most betta kits seem to come with those and they don't really filter the tank. I forgot there are also sponge filters, which I heard are quite effective!

I think I actually have something like you pictured around. I just have to find where I put it.
 

Squishy

Songster
8 Years
Feb 2, 2011
2,428
8
196
Florida
How is your fish doing?

If youaren't feeding him regularly by now, I would start again. The pea is just fiber to help clean out his gut, just like the daphnia, thats why they are recommended. But Bettas are strict carnivores and he's not getting anything from that pea. So don't forget to feed him.
And though I hesitate to change a system thats worked so well for your Betta... in his older age, he may need more frequent feedings. You can make them even smaller... but a Betta should be eating at least every day without fail. Once a week they can have a break and have the pea to clear out their system... but I wouldn't leave them on one of those eating every other or every couple days schedule.... it's not healthy for them. In the wild they eat tiny creatures whenever they happen upon them.

I wouldn't change too much in the tank... try to think any changes out carefully before you take them, when your fish is already ill or delicate. If there might be an enviromental cause for the oily surface, find it and fix it... but keep him in the same home hes used to because a change is stressful. If you can only get a little airstone or bubble something... just get one of those. They do not filter, no.... but they do make it easier for an ailing fish to breathe by enabling them to use their gills as well... the extra oxygen can decrease populations of harmful bacteria and increase the good bacteria.... and I found my fishie who had a bit of fin rot just recently... loved to sit right over his bubble wand... and he got better so much faster... I think he was taking a "bath" in bubbles, and it helped "wash" the bacteria off him.

Remember that bacteria and illness, especially in the case of an old or a stressed fish... is not always your fault or the result of dirty water. The bacteria that cause fish illness are *always* present in their water, from hands/equipment, from the air itself in the room contacting the water, their own bodies even shed it from previous enviroments. Whether they get sick from it or not has to do with bacteria count (lack of cleanliness), other fishie stressing factors, and their general health & immune system.
 

Chickerdoodle13

The truth is out there...
12 Years
Mar 5, 2007
6,820
389
331
Phoenix, AZ
Thanks Squishy.

He's still kicking, but still bloated and having trouble swimming. He's a little less bloated than he was before and still acting like his normal self minus the swimming. I'm still not sure what the oil is from. There is nothing around him that would cause it and I only rinse his tank with hot water like I always do. It could be from the pea I suppose, but I think I had only fed him one half right before cleaning the tank and one the next day after.

I guess time will tell. I have some betta meds, but I don't really want to start using them because I think they'll stress him more than anything else. I really do think it is just constipation, but I was hoping to see him better by now.

I did give him a little food this morning when I woke up. I think it's been about a week now anyways. I usually feed him every day unless I forget, but that doesn't happen too often. He gets around three little pellets at night or during the day. I tend to feed him earlier than my mom did when she weas taking care of him.
 

Nicola

Chook Cuddlin' Aussie
10 Years
Feb 23, 2009
2,896
2
179
ACT
Constipation in them is mostly caused by a lack of liquid in their foods, try soaking his betta pellets before giving them to him so they aren't dry, and some frozen food like blood worms may be good aswell since they have liquid in them, i would put epsom salts in his water, as that helps them poop


Mine was all bloaty the other day i just caught it as i overfed him at the time and he was having trouble swimming.. epsom salts in the water he pooped and was fine an hour later
 

theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
May 11, 2010
30,162
9,192
737
Years ago I did a rotation at UGA where the students were researching diseases of pet fish. I was amazed how often pet fish developed tumors. I watched them removed a tumor from one of those giant bubble-headed gold fish whose name I can't recall at the moment. The procedure was incredible to watch. The fish was anesthetized by placing tubes positioned to push the anesthetic solution through the gills. The fish was taken out of his aquarium and placed on a 'wet' table. Treated, sterile water was trickled on the fish as the surgeon removed the tumor. Fortunately, the growth was localized and did not require drastic measures to remove. The fish recovered, although he had an open wound which healed with no problem. A big difference from when they dropped an alka seltzer in the tank and allowed the C02 to immobilize the fish.

Older fish can develop internal tumors, also. Swimbladders don't function well in older fish and the fish develops an bloated appearance as you have noticed. So long as he's eating and defecating he will be able to maintain a good quality of life. Unfortunately, as the bladder increases in size other organs are compromised. The simple heart can't work like it should and the fish can't excrete waste.

You've done a great job to keep a betta for 4 years and I understand your attachment to him. He's been with you through all those tough times giving silent support by flashing his beauty when you needed a bright spot in your day. Just maintain his current lifestyle. At his age he's earned a dignified exit from this life.
 

Chickerdoodle13

The truth is out there...
12 Years
Mar 5, 2007
6,820
389
331
Phoenix, AZ
Hey guys, just wanted to let you know that my old betta is STILL alive, but he looks terrible. He has practically survived a whole month, which I did not expect at all. He was eating well until last week. Now he can't really grab the food or keep it down. The poor thing tries though. He's still very bloated and now his scales are all sticking out. I know I should probably just bring him outside and use a cinder block to put him out of his misery. I just hate to do it. Maybe today or tomorrow I will. He is pretty much just starving right now and I hate to see him suffer.

If he doesn't kick the bucket by the time I get back from the gym today, I think I will consider putting him out of his misery.
 

WestKnollAmy

The Crazy Chicken Lady
11 Years
Apr 22, 2008
10,061
273
381
upstate SC
Wow! Didn't realize there was a thread for this. I love my Bettas.
Right now I only have one girl but usually keep several boys since they are gorgeous and easy to care for. The longest one I had to live was Tiger, an orange fella that lived over 2 years.
I enjoy having them on my island in front of my sink so I can talk to them as I do endless kitchen chores. I mainly have the Betta for the plants that I can't seem to keep alive. Fish water seems to help the plants for a while.
I find Bettas to be very personable.
 

Chickerdoodle13

The truth is out there...
12 Years
Mar 5, 2007
6,820
389
331
Phoenix, AZ
aww don't use a cinder block.

freeze in a cup of water or something

don't flush either - they survive the flush and travel on a strange journey :p
I'm not such a fan of the freezing method, as it seems a long process for the poor fishy. The cinder block method may be messy, but it is quick for the fish. I figure I can just put him in a plastic baggy. I still haven't decided yet. He's still kickin' though, which is very, very surprising. He just does NOT want to die.
 

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