INDIANA BYC'ers HERE!

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by jchny2000, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. barb s

    barb s Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 28, 2013
    Columbia City area
    The Isbars, Breda, Light Sussex, Coronation Sussex and Swedish Flower Hens I ordered from Walt's Ark. I just added Silver Sussex to the order. They have American, Australian and Canadian lines of Sussex. You can pick the line that you want or get a mix of lines, which is what I did. Very nice to deal with. My chicks will be arriving in May. I'm soooo excited. I also just ordered 3 Buckeye and 3 German New Hampshires from Sunbird Farms. Waiting on confirmation and delivery date on them. I think that I will be getting them sooner than next spring though. Maybe when you are ready for some New Hampshires I will be able to help you out.

    We bought an old farmhouse on 2 acres of ground this summer. The house needed quite a bit of work done to it before we could move in so we have been working on that. Its been a long process as we are doing all the work ourselves. It's amazing how everyone just disappears when you need help but if they need help they expect you to drop everything to help them. Anyways, we are finally getting close and hope to be moved in by the end of the month. The property already had an 8 x 8 chicken coop on it and my sister gave me a 10 x 12 shed turned chicken coop that we moved over there a couple of weekends ago. Both need work done to them, but I hope to be able to at least get them ready for the chickens this weekend. I think that since my DF's son is who is moving into our current house that I should be able to get a lot of help because I have already informed them and my DF that I am not moving without my chickens.

    My DF is a wonderful man. He doesn't care how many chickens or animals that I have. He loves the fresh eggs we get. He doesn't get to eat the chickens though. Our goal is to become totally self sufficient. Having grown up farming and raising farm animals he knows that you have to have good quality stock in order for it to pay off. So he's all for the Heritage Breeds of chickens as long as I don't go to far overboard at one time.

    I do have a question both breeders that I am getting chicks from vaccinate for Merak's and none of the chickens that I currently have are vaccinated. Is this going to be a problem? Okay I have two questions. If I do end up getting the Buckeye and New Hampshire in the next couple of weeks how long do I need to keep them quarantined from my other chicks?

    Sorry for the long post guess I got a little carried away.
     
  2. barb s

    barb s Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 28, 2013
    Columbia City area
    adorable!!
     
  3. browncow15

    browncow15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2013
    Indiana

    I haven't used hay or straw in my chicken coop at all. I do use straw bedding for my cows though so I'll keep the mold issue in mind. I didn't realize straw took so long to break down, but I did notice an awful lot of it still visible when we moved the manure pile a few weeks ago!



    By sediment filter do you mean just a string filter? We have one on ours it helps a ton! Especially before we had a new well drilled.

    Stupid question, I can usually figure out the breed abbreviations but what is a BCM ?
     
  4. kabhyper1

    kabhyper1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Okay guys bear with me, I have another question. My silkie apparently got poop on her feet and layed on her eggs. Now they have poop on them. Its not brood poop because there would be a lot bigger mess lol. They are 14 days in. Should I wash them in water? Or leave them be. I heard dry wiping pushes bacteria into the shell so I didn't want to do that. Help!
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2013
  5. SallyinIndiana

    SallyinIndiana Overrun With Chickens

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Bargersville, Indiana
    I would let the eggs be.
     
  6. kabhyper1

    kabhyper1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Okay, thanks. I figured since there are hens who hide their eggs and we never know bout them, hatch chicks just fine. I'm sure the eggs don't stay spotless in a pile of dirt in the woods somewhere. lol It just looks unsanitary. I don't want to hurt them by over helping. I just wasn't sure if I should do something or not.
     
  7. wheezy50

    wheezy50 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 12, 2013
    Morgan Co.
    Here is a couple pics I've taken so far. 9 of 10 eggs hatched but two chicks didn't make it through the first night. But we have 7 happy, healthy little ones. Five are bantams and two LF.
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. wheezy50

    wheezy50 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 12, 2013
    Morgan Co.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. racinchickins

    racinchickins Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2013
    Mooresville IN
    You heard correctly. We got our first hives this year, and no honey till next year. You want to make sure the bees have plenty stored up to make is through the winter. Once the hive gets established, then you can get honey. We are looking at top bar hives too, plan is to have them ready to either split an existing hive next year, or get new bees and add a hive.
    Very cute chicks. What breed or mix are they?
     
  10. PeacefulWalls

    PeacefulWalls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2013
    Goshen, Indiana
    Quote:
    Our family ventured into beekeeping. 3 years ago both of the kids joined the 4-H bee club. The first 2 years of club the project requirement was a poster to display. We were still in town and didn't have a place for hives, so we spent that time learning. Last year, once we were living out of town, we set up 2 hives. We wanted the benefit of the pollination for our garden & the orchard we planted, but especially wanted to produce our own honey. I personally think it takes a certain type of personality to have bees -- you really have to want to do it. My son was kind of wishy-washy about it, but my daughter & I thought we would enjoy it. For a while during the spring and early summer it wasn't bad for us. But what we hated was when it was time to take frames out and get all the bees off so we could extract honey for fair. We didn't really have a good way to do it and we were so afraid of making just a couple of the bees mad enough that they would sting & send out the warning pheromones to the others to attack! (Happened once when some accidently got stepped on - yikes!) It also seemed like whenever it was time to check the fullness of the frames hives it was super hot, we were sweltering in our bee suits and it took us forever since we were so new. Quite the sensation to have thousands of bees swarming around and on you with just the smoker to use to puff "calming" puffs of smoke around! For us, it just turned out not to be an enjoyable experience, which I was kind of disappointed about. It became a dreaded task to tend to them. It's not a lot of work, but it's work that has to be done when it is time for it -- some tasks can't be postponed -- especially if your hive is too full. If you wait an extra day you might not have a hive left because they're swarmed looking for more space. Often we were so busy with other stuff that we weren't able to tend to things when we should have. Sometimes (often?) we felt like we really had no clue what we were doing or what needed to be done & when -- could have used a bit more mentoring. One other negative that was fairly unique for us -- since the bees have to have access to water, they decided our little beach area by our pond was the perfect spot for them -- all that nice, wet sand at the edge of the water. We had to be sooo careful every time we went to swim so we wouldn't step on them. A couple of feet did actually get stung. We were pretty tired of that by the end of summer. All these things obviously influenced how we felt about the whole adventure.

    However, you could have the personality of our 4-H club leader who is in heaven with all the bees swarming around him -- says it is calming! [​IMG] I think it's one of those things -- either love it or hate it. On the flip side, we had sooo much fun when it was actually time to extract and bottle the honey. If that's all we had to do I'd love it. We extracted about 140 lbs. of honey. A lot of people bought honey from us multiple times -- said they loved it -- and were sorry when we didn't have any more left to sell. We still have our 2 complete hives & equipment in my garden work shed. Not sure if we'll try it again in a couple of years or end up selling it all -- it was a pricey adventure! But at least my gardening area has a wonderful honey smell on warm sunny days when the temperature goes up in there -- love the honey house smell!
     

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