Injured Wild Loon...Any rehabbbers in VT?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by my first peepers, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. my first peepers

    my first peepers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 9, 2008
    South Western VT
    Hi, I found an injured loon near my home in Western VT and I'm trying to find someone who can rehab it. Does anyone out there know what I should do? I have called a few numbers I found online but I'm not having much luck.
    Thanks
     
  2. annmarie

    annmarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 20, 2007
    Have you seen this webpage from VINS (Vermont Institute of Natural Science)? This should help!

    http://www.vinsweb.org/raptor-center/index.html#rehab

    For injured birds, bird problems, wildlife identification and natural history questions: 802-359-5001 x212 - VINS Avian Rehabilitation Department

    In Vermont

    For injured bats/bat problems please call the Rabies Hotline at 1-800-4-RABIES. For bear, bobcat, deer and turkey call VT Fish and Wildlife at 802-241-3727 or 802-241-3700

    Addison County

    Rose Gale
    Salisbury, VT
    Phone: (802) 352-4448
    Permitted for: mice, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, hares

    Dona Norton
    Starksboro, VT
    Phone: (802) 453-4476
    Permitted for: fawns


    Caledonia County

    Aimee DeMaio
    Concord, VT
    Phone: (802) 695-4619
    Permitted for: songbirds


    Chittenden County

    Candace Brueck
    Hinesburg, VT
    Phone: (802) 482-6032
    Cell: (802) 734-1331
    Permitted for: small mammals

    Nancy Carey – Pine Haven Refuge
    Underhill Center, VT
    Phone: (802) 899-1027
    Permitted for: mammals, including rabies vectors

    Craig Newman – Outreach for Earth Stewardship
    Jericho, VT
    Phone: (802) 899-3667
    Cell: (802) 324-6958
    Permitted for: crows, ravens and raptors

    JoAnn Nichols
    Burlington, VT
    Phone: (802) 651-6863
    Permitted for: reptiles, mice, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, hares, woodchucks, porcupines, opossums

    Helena Nordstrom
    Burlington, VT
    Phone (Home): (802) 864-4311
    Permitted for: waterfowl, small mammals



    Franklin County

    Audrey Von Lepel
    Fairfax, VT
    Phone: (802) 849-2844
    Permitted for: songbirds, small mammals


    Rutland County

    Fred Homer
    Williamsville, VT
    Phone (home): (802) 348-7889
    Phone (Work): (802) 348-7768 (can leave message for Fred here) Permitted for: songbirds, crows, ravens, raptors
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2009
  3. chickiebaby

    chickiebaby Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2008
    western mass
    Excellent links above. In addition, look up Tom Ricardi - I think he's even listed in the phone book. He lives in my neck of the woods, in Conway MA I believe - close to Brattleboro, etc, and he calls back right away. He is an unbelieveably lovely guy and wild birds are his life's work - he's got to be seventy at this point.

    He is one of the only bald eagle certified guys in the country, and he handles raptors of all kinds. Tho loons arent raptors, he knows absolutely everything bout birds up and down the corridor that includes your state. He will know just who to call for help.

    Here's one link I found fast just so you know who he is.

    Keep us posted. Loons are so beautiful. best.

    http://www.cvps.com/eagles/people-ricardi.shtml
     
  4. annmarie

    annmarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 20, 2007
    Transporting Injured Birds:

    Place box or paper bag in a quiet, temperate area and transport to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator as soon as possible.
    Provide a quiet, dark place for birds to rest while waiting for transport.
    DO NOT HANDLE THE BIRDS, OR LOOK AT THEM ANY MORE THAN IS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY. STRESS KILLS!
    Attempting to feed is NOT recommended. It is usually best to provide water only.
    Never transport a bird held in a person's lap or loose in the vehicle. The bird could get loose and cause an accident.
    Speak quietly, do not play the radio in your car.




    Handling Injured Adult Birds


    Any wild animal including birds, when scarred, will try to protect itself no matter how big or small. When you approach a wild bird they do not understand that you are trying to help. Unlike baby birds that will gape for food from anyone, adult birds are very frightened of people!

    Cats carry a bacteria (Pasteurella multocida) in their saliva that is very toxic to birds and can cause death within 48 hours. Any bird found with a cat should be examined by a Wildlife Rehabilitator immediately.



    Prepare a box (before capturing the bird if possible) by placing ventilation holes in the top of the box and placing a towel or paper towels on the bottom of the box for traction. The box should be large enough for them to stand in but small enough to keep them from flapping or flying around.

    Gently pick up the bird with an appropriately sized towel. Place a towel or sheet over the bird. Pick up the bird, covering and all, and place in the box. Gently try to remove the covering, leaving the bird in the box. If the bird is firmly attached to the towel or sheet try to at least uncover the bird's head.
    Use gloves (such as welders gloves) in addition to the sheet or towel and wear eye protection when handling loons, herons and other birds with long necks and large pointed beaks. These birds should be approached with great caution. They will strike at your face with great accuracy!
    Place the bird in the box and put the box in a quiet room, away from extreme temperatures.
    Take the bird to a wildlife rehabilitator as soon as possible following the transport instructions above.
    Injured owl or hawk adults:
    approach raptors with great caution. Most injured raptors will use their strong feet & talons as their main protection but will also bite.
    Use of gloves (such as welders gloves) in addition to a sheet or towel is recommended.

    Place a towel or sheet over the raptor allowing them to grasp it with their feet.
    Pick up the bird, covering and all, and place in the box.
    Gently try to remove the covering, leaving the bird in the box. If the bird is firmly attached to the towel or sheet try to at least uncover the bird's head.

    Transport the raptor to a wildlife rehabilitator as described above.
     
  5. annmarie

    annmarie Chillin' With My Peeps

    359
    3
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    Nov 20, 2007
    Good luck. I hope all goes well for your poor loon. Please keep us posted!
     
  6. chickiebaby

    chickiebaby Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2008
    western mass
    Tom Ricardi's phone: (see above msg for who he is) : 413-369-4072. I'll pm this to you as well.

    best.
     
  7. my first peepers

    my first peepers Chillin' With My Peeps

    244
    0
    119
    Jul 9, 2008
    South Western VT
    Thanks all![​IMG]
    I finally got in touch with someone at VINS (Vermont Institute of Natural Sciences) and they hooked me up with a local vet that they work with. He said he would try and get the bird (not sure it's a loon after all but a very pretty kind of duck...even the vet wasn't sure) through the night and if it makes it he will take it over to VINS to be rehabbed and released. I will post if there is good news!
     
  8. chickensducks&agoose

    chickensducks&agoose Chillin' With My Peeps

    If they can't release it, I'll take it!!!
     

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