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Installing walls and trusses

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by operationminifarm, Jun 17, 2011.

  1. operationminifarm

    operationminifarm New Egg

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    So I am looking at installing my walls soon. I will be using 1/2inch osb board. I was wondering what the best way to go about doing it was. obviously I will use some 2x4 framing in between my 4x4 posts. I was thinking I would set the framing back a half inch and set the wall on the floor of the coop and in between the 4x4 posts. Is that necessary? or can I just nail it into the frame and or 4x4 posts and have it hanging off? I wasn't sure if the entire weight of the wall would be too much stress on the nails/screws holding the walls up.

    Also for my trusses I am putting up. How many of these: http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay...gId=10051&cmRelshp=req&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1 should I use per truss? would one on each side do or should I be using 4 per truss? For example front and back on both sides of the truss of simple 1 tie per side?

    Thanks,
    Daniel
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    I wouldn't suggest using OSB (esp. not 1/2") for your walls unless it will be covered with Real Siding?

    Does this coop have a wooden floor? In which case the walls need to rest on top of the floor (on the floor joists/sills anyhow).

    If OTOH it is a pole-built shed with a dirt floor, you would not normally do stud-framed walls in the first place, but if you do then I'd suggest resting them on a sill or ledger or whatever ya wanna call it, a board bolted horizontally between the bottoms of the posts.

    One rafter tie (or hurricane tie or whatever you want to call it) per end of truss, so, 2 total per truss. Make sure to use the correct nails -- they are shorter and fatter than normal nails, and galvanized with a sort of rough surface, they are made specifically for use with this type hardware.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  3. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    The framing for the wall should rest on the floor and be FLUSH with the posts, so that the OSB ties the wall and posts together.

    The floor should also be flush with the posts, but if it's not, you can fill in the gap or allow the wall to overhang a little to cover it.

    I'd put one tie on each end of the trusses and also "toe nail" the trusses to the top plate
     
  4. VelvettFog

    VelvettFog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use these.

    http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay...gId=10051&cmRelshp=req&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

    I would not set your framing back 1/2". I'd put the framing flush with your 4x4's so that I can attach the sheeting to the frame and the posts. Once you hit 10 posts you can put up pictures -- run and make 7 more silly posts, then come back and show us pictures of what you have so far. We can really give good advice when we can see what you have so far.



    Dave
     
  5. cooper38

    cooper38 Out Of The Brooder

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    Either way with the osb will work. It will be stronger and tie everything together if you keep your framing flush with the 4x4 and floor system and nail the osb over it all. Just rember osb is 8' long If you have 8' walls you will have to put small pieces in to fill the gap.

    As far as the hurricane straps, you can get away without them. If you want the piece of mind just put one on each end of the truss (2 per truss).

    Good luck with your project
     
  6. VelvettFog

    VelvettFog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OSB is not a full 8' in length. It is short by about 1/16".
     
  7. operationminifarm

    operationminifarm New Egg

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    Here is a shot of it currently. The floor is flesh (mostly) with the 4x4 posts. The entire coop + run is 4'x16'. The coop portion, from the measure of the outside of the posts is 4'x6'

    [​IMG]
     
  8. operationminifarm

    operationminifarm New Egg

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    So Most people seem to recommend make the frame flesh with the 4x4 posts. Then Attach the OSB walls to the posts and frame to tie it all together.

    Any suggestions on how to attach? What type of nails and/or screws? Do you use and hardware?

    -Daniel
     
  9. Kyle241

    Kyle241 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Daniel,

    You should use screws for the OSB as nailing into it is difficult unless you have a framing nail gun. In addition, you should use screws such as 'deck screws' that can tolerate treated wood. If you use regular screws, they will rot out in no time with the treated wood. I am using 2 1/2" screws myself but that is because I already had a half a box from my house construction. You could easily use 2" as my guess is the OSB you are installing is 7/16"? You just want to make sure you get a good 1" into the posts. I use other hardware for installing trusses and joists such as hangers.
     
  10. moetrout

    moetrout Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am a big fan of using deck screws. 2 1/2" for framing the walls and 1 1/4" for attaching the siding. I used truss ties on my coup, 2 per truss and used deck screws (1 1/4") to attach them. If you use deck screws it will not rust and you could always take it apart for remodeling, redesign, or to move it. I just feel screws are much better than nails any day.
     

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