Is a single light bulb sufficient to light a 5x7 coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Amy's Animals, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. Amy's Animals

    Amy's Animals Chillin' With My Peeps

    331
    1
    121
    Jul 8, 2009
    Southern Oregon
    I just got a new (well used but new to me) coop. It's 5x7 and I already painted it and pressure washed it, and its about ready for new inhabitants.
    I bought a porcelain socket for a single light bulb. Do you think that will give off enough light to keep my hens laying throughout the winter ?
    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. swheat

    swheat The Bantam Barn

    Mar 18, 2008
    Alabama
    My Coop
    Yes, a single light bulb will be sufficient to light your coop. It is best to have the light to come on early in the morning and go off after sunrise. They will need at least 14 hours of light. I have mine set on a timer to come on at 3:30 am and turns off at 7:00 am.
     
  3. Amy's Animals

    Amy's Animals Chillin' With My Peeps

    331
    1
    121
    Jul 8, 2009
    Southern Oregon
    Thanks,
    Yes, I was planning on turning it on around 4 AM and then around sunrise yes.
     
  4. chookchick

    chookchick Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,901
    22
    176
    Aug 18, 2008
    Olympia WA
    Yes, I have read here that they just need enough to read a newspaper by. Though why a chicken would read a newspaper is beyond me, and I don't think mine are even able to read. But apparently some do......
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    95
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Oh yes, by all means, and you may only need a low-wattage one. Try a 40. If your walls are light-colored and your ceiling not bizarrely high, that's prolly plenty.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  6. gsim

    gsim Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,993
    20
    176
    Jun 18, 2009
    East Tennessee
    I have unfinished walls and have an 8x16 coop. I used two dual 40 W fluorescent shop light fixtures fastened to rafters at 7 1/2 ft above floor. They are only on briefly at dusk and in AM when I let them out. Only other times is when I am working in coop. I think they were about $7 each not counting house wire and switch on wall.

    I ran a 140 ft water line, 3/4", along with a 12 ga (20 amp) line and also an 8-wire tel line to coop before building it. Never used the latter one yet, but maybe the chooks would like some Bach or Mozart piped in some day ?
     
  7. cherylcohen

    cherylcohen The Omelet Ranch

    5,357
    28
    271
    Sep 18, 2009
    SF East Bay CA
  8. Highland Moongazer

    Highland Moongazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    200
    0
    129
    Jul 9, 2009
    Marshall, NC
    Quote:[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    95
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Well you know, often they have to sit in the nestbox for a while before the egg comes out, I'm sure you've seen them there staring off into space looking bored, stands to reason they'd be more apt to go in there and lay if they have reading matter to occupy them while they wait, sort of like a magazine rack next to your toilet [​IMG]
    Pat
     
  10. bukbugack

    bukbugack Out Of The Brooder

    97
    0
    39
    Oct 9, 2009
    L.I. New York
    A single fixture is just fine for that size coop. I aolso agree with 14 hrs./day of light. However, if you want to see more of your birds this winter, as well as cut down on 4am egg-calling, you can have the light stay on in the evening, too.

    I just use a multi plug adaptor with a second timer. The second timer has a nightlight plugged into it, and is set to go off a half hour after the main light. this provides an artificial dusk that lets the birds know it's time to get up to their roosts. Chickens do have a good built-in clock, though. My birds are usually ready for bed even before the nightlight comes on.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by