Is free range sufficient or should you supplement feed

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Batlow Biddy, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. Batlow Biddy

    Batlow Biddy New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2013
    Batlow Australia
    I have four Australorp crosses that free range till dark every day (unless we are not at home-which isnt very often) they are healthy and are all producing eggs every day. BUT they are not showing any interest in scratch mix or layer pellets . They even turned their noses up at a neighbours bounty of greens. Is it because they are getting sufficient from their natural diet?[​IMG] I still leave it out (the wild birds love it[​IMG]) with fresh water and grit, but it generally goes untouched. Any thoughts[​IMG]. They have been doing a great job around the fenceline of my property - no need to Whippersnip(string line cutter) and I haven't seen a snail in weeks!!!!![​IMG]
     
  2. Batlow Biddy

    Batlow Biddy New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2013
    Batlow Australia
    I meant to add they do eat it if they are in their enclosure for the day.
     
  3. KuroKitsune

    KuroKitsune Chillin' With My Peeps

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    when it gets cold and the bugs and green stuff(grass, weeds, etc) die they will eat more of it as thats all there is...and they may be eating it now just not very much as you let them free range all day
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  4. cybercat

    cybercat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As fall gets closer bugs go down in population. You will need to increase store /home made feed. I free range but feed before lock up at night. but then again I am feeding 50 chickens here. Your are probably getting enough since it is just 4.
     
  5. yankeehill

    yankeehill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Even in the fall they should find enough bugs, until freezing temps hit. They will then love the pine straw and leaf piles! For now, leave them be. Offer supplemental feed. If they eat it, they eat it, if not, oh well.

    In thinking ahead, you could start a compost pile (if you don't have one already) for them. I throw anything but meats in the compost. In the winter, we shovel a path through the snow to the compost pile for the birds. It's very amusing. First they sun themselves on the rocks in front of the coop, then they head straight for the compost.
     
  6. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If they are not eating much of the feed then I would say your pasture is sufficient now. Come the change of seasons like possibly drying out during your coming summer then things may change. When you free range you have to watch the condition of the range.
     
  7. Batlow Biddy

    Batlow Biddy New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2013
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    Thanks for your reply, we are just coming into our spring and everything is on the grow.
     
  8. Batlow Biddy

    Batlow Biddy New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2013
    Batlow Australia
    Thanks for your reply, we do get snow here but more often than not in winter its just cold and wet. I do have a compost heap-but they haven't found it yet,and I don't add any meat or bones anyway.Its coming into spring here so everything is blooming. To make a liar of me this morning they had eaten everything on offer in their pen and refused to leave until I gave them some more[​IMG].THEN they disappeared up to my flower garden and proceeded to demolish my daffodils- I also know that a lot of bulbs are bad for them but they just trampled and scratched them up.

    My new profile picture says it all. I got these three eggs this morning 2/9/2013 . The XXlarge one was a double yolker twice the weight of the
    second one. They must be getting all thegoodness they need.The coin is an australian 20c piece about 3.5 cm across.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013

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