Is My Backyard Okay For a Coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by SKG1121, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. SKG1121

    SKG1121 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    first, sorry if this is in the wrong section, I wasn't quite sure where to post it.

    I really want a few chickens but I'm not quite sure if my home would be good for them, so I would really appreciate if anyone could answer these questions:

    I have a small box turtle(6 inches) thats lived in my yard for eight years. Would the chickens attack it? (he's doesn't have a problem cats, but are chickens smarter?)
    My neighbors have cats that come into my yard; how much of an issue would it be if cats were around the coop?
    Is grass a necessity?
    How much space would three chickens need?
    Are there any types of chickens that aren't loud? My neighbors house is really close to mine.
    thanks for taking the time to read this =]
     
  2. SKG1121

    SKG1121 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. Jaxon4141

    Jaxon4141 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can build one like that yourself that is 3 times longer and cost half as much. If you can cut wire fencing and know how to use zip ties you can do it. There are many great ideas on this forum if you browse around. Find one you like and ask the person that built it how hard it was.
     
  4. SKG1121

    SKG1121 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thanks for the input [​IMG]
     
  5. Hawkeye95

    Hawkeye95 Chillin' With My Peeps

    The plastic coop you posted is $295-- I don't think you could build another coop twice as big for HALF the price. Honestly, lumber costs, and you'll spend anywhere from $40 to $80 on hardware and screws alone. T1-11 is $35 a sheet unless you get creative using something else. None of this is super expensive... but it IS going to add up. But I bet you can still build a lot bigger and nicer coop for that price, and maybe a bit less. I doubt that the chickens are going to be too interested in your turtle.. but I guess I can't promise you that they won't. If they are raised around the turtle, they won't have any issues. If you are going to have a run where they won't have access to each other, then no biggie. You just need to make sure that your city allows chickens... and if they do, I'd go for it! They are so much fun. I have a few breeds of chickens. I think my silkies are the quietest, but not always. It just depends on if they found something yummy, or laid an egg (that can be loud, but doesn't last long). The loudest they will be will be during the middle of the day, they are VERY quiet in the evening and at night. If your neighbors work during the day, they may never hear them at all.
     
  6. SKG1121

    SKG1121 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks!



    The one thing I was worried about was that coop has no roosting poles, are they neccesary?
    Also, does anyone have experience informing neighbors about the chickens? I'm worried they won't want me to get them.
    Lastly, can you recommend any chickens besides silkies that are quiet and good in the summer (here its humid and 90-105)
     
  7. Hawkeye95

    Hawkeye95 Chillin' With My Peeps

    All of my birds like to roost except for my silkies-- they pile up on a floor. Mass lump of feathers with heads tucked into each other. I really like my barred rocks the best- they are super friendly and not too loud. They are also not very skittish, so they don't freak out when you get close. My Polish are more flighty and are louder because they are trying to get out of your way. Same with the others. Pick a breed well known to be friendly and more 'pet-like' and it's likely you'll have a quieter bird just because they are more laid back. I never hear my neighbors birds-- he has Buff Orpingtons and they are REALLY friendly. If your city ordinance allows chickens, you really have no need to ask your neighbors if you can have them. They are a heck of a lot quieter than a dog barking all day long and jumping on fences and causing a racket. My other neighbor has white leghorns and they are noisy and flighty and crazy birds.

    ETA: for the larger breeds, I'd say YES a roosting board would be necessary. I just don't think they'd be as happy with out one. It doesn't have to be really tall-- just something to get a couple feet off the ground.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  8. SKG1121

    SKG1121 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    white leghorns are loud?
    I was thinking about getting a Golden Campine, EE, Quail Antwerp Belgian Bantam, and a White Leghorn. Should I not get that one then?
     
  9. Hawkeye95

    Hawkeye95 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't see any reason why you shouldn't. :) If you want one, get it! Besides, they all have different personalities-- yours might be really nice. They are known to be more flighty than the others, but maybe you could really hold that one a lot as a chick and see what happens.
     
  10. ChickenMan77

    ChickenMan77 Out Of The Brooder

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    I currently have 4 chickens laying and 5 chicks in the house. My house and yard is situated very close to 4 neighbors. I placed the coop as far away from all the houses as possible. They can get loud, as mentioned before, when an egg is laid. For my hens this can happen at around sunrise some times. My wife and I went around and talked to all the neighbors when we realized that one of our chicks was a rooster. My wife also made up a little card with our contact info on it and a little picture of an innocent looking baby chick. This helped them to feel like they had our permission to call us if they began to have an issue with the chickens, we have never received a call. You could also offer to give them eggs. We didn't keep our rooster, at 12 weeks he was re-purposed. For the most part in my area people are very relaxed about such things though. Regarding the cats they could become a problem. My cat has totally ignored our hens even when they were chicks in the house so we have been lucky. It is funny to see our English Setters pointing a dove on the fence while the chickens peck the ground in front of the dogs. We worked with the dogs too so they understood the chickens were family not food. I don't see the turtle being an issue at all for the hens but I have never had a turtle. I hope this helps.
     

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