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LAB TEST Results -- The Verdict Is In. Can Any1 Elaborate?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MacCana, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. MacCana

    MacCana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can Anyone help decipher this? Is this something my birds will be life carriers of? Pass through to eggs?
    See, I have gotten finally gotten the report back on the guinea. The rooster's should come in the morning too. I will try to attach it on here for anyone curious, and also because I need help deciphering what exactly they are saying the problem is, which is apparently Bacterial Enteritis. I have Googled and came up with necrotic enteritis, but I am looking for the meaning of this specifically -- if anyone should know? or possibly have some links to sites with info on this? I still plan on calling the vet in the morning, he'll may be at last be able to tell me what that means. It is killing me not knowing their fates [​IMG] Okay...so it won't let me make an attachment. I guess I'll have to paste it here....

    Okay, here...

    Purpose of Test:
    Diagnostic

    Animal Information:
    Guinea Fowl ; AVIAN - Guinea Fowl

    Diagnosis:
    Bacterial Enteritis

    Final Diagnosis Comment:
    The most significant histopathological finding is the bacterial enteritis. Bacterial culture from intestine yielded E. coli (see results below). Consultation with your veterinarian is recommended for prevention and treatment options.

    Gross Examination:
    Presented is a young, male, Guinea Fowl in good body condition with mild postmortem autolysis. On general examination, the head is decapitated (euthanasia). Upon opening the body, there is multiorgan congestion (common postmortem finding). The liver is pale. The small intestine is focally reddened. No other significant gross findings are observed in the body.

    Gross Examination Diagnosis:
    Enteritis
    Euthanasia

    Gross Examination Comments:
    More results will follow to determine the cause of clinical respiratory signs as stated by owner.
    Histopathology:
    Multiple tissues are examined. Sections from intestine are moderately thickened by lymphocytes, plasma cells and heterophils. The liver has diffuse vacular change. There is mild fat atrophy within the mesentery. Remaining tissues are unremarkable.

    Lab Findings Page 1 of 2 - Final (10/8/2014)
    - Ellington Agricultural Center - Accession No: K1419857
    Bacteriology:
    Sample
    Test Name
    Organism
    Quantifier

    Guinea Fowl - AVIAN - Guinea Fowl

    Lung - Fresh Tissue - 1:
    Aerobic Culture Farm
    No Growth
    Intestine - Swab/Culturette - 2
    Aerobic Culture Farm
    Escherichia coli, Beta-haemolytic
    >500 cfu


    Liver - Fresh Tissue - 3
    Aerobic Culture Farm
    Escherichia coli, Beta-haemolytic
    <25 cfu


    Immunology:
    Sample
    Test Name
    Result
    Guinea Fowl - AVIAN - Guinea Fowl


    Lung - Fresh Tissue - 1:
    Chlamydia - FA (Farm)
    Negative


    Liver - Fresh Tissue - 3:
    Chlamydia - FA (Farm)
    Negative


    Spleen - Fresh Tissue - 4:
    Chlamydia - FA (Farm)
    Negative


    Parasitology:
    Guinea Fowl - Feces - 2
    Test: Fecal Flotation - Sucrose Centrifugation Method:
    Organism 1
    No parasitic forms seen


    BTW, in my state, if you eat your birds, or their eggs, they must test them for you for free. And I am sure I asked for every test they could do. I live in Tennessee. Total, this cost me approx. $40 for the packaging, ice packs, and overnight shipping.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Here's a link for you. Scroll down to "Necrotic Enteritis" and "Ulcerative Enteritis" and read about them if you wish:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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  4. MacCana

    MacCana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ah geez. I was afraid of that since those two were the only things with enteritis in it popping up. Will they be life carriers then? If so I'm going to depopulate. This probably also means our flock turkey is infected too? And I was able to collect 3 eggs out of my silkie pen a few days before I started noticing symptoms in my adult flocks. Only one was fertile, & a few days ago, it Hatched out into a beautiful baby silkie. Could it have it too? I need to know before I become anymore attached to it. If it's safe, I plan on raising it indoors with us until Spring. Just in case.
     
  5. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Has your regular vet offered any advice on treatment/ or culling? How to disinfect coops, grounds, etc. if that will help at all? If you can have new flocks in the future. I agree you get test results and they just leave you with that.

    When I get human test results, the doctor on the phone will give a blanket answer like "all your tests were fine." and leave it at that. I always ask the lab to mail me a copy of results. I can't understand most of it but, when it flags something as H or L instead of normal range - I get upset that the doctor only gave a quick look at the report.

    I'm sorry you have to go through this and lab results give many more questions instead of useful answers.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Enteritis isn't something that passes onto other chickens to the egg. Maybe you need to step back and take a look at your practices with your flock. Enteritis seems to be caused by having coccidiosis in the past, or from feeding certain grains instead of a balanced diet of a feed just for chickens or game birds, which has all of the nutrients needed. Probiotics in the diet may help, and there are good supplements to use in your water. Keeping the chicken area as clean and dry with fresh bedding as possible is the key. Not overcrowding birds into too little of an area, a regular deworming schedule, and separating or culling sick chickens may help. I don't know what your setup is like, and it may be just fine, but step back and look. Even people who take very good care of their chickens can have 1 or 2 get enteritis. You can't sterilize the ground or their environment, but there are steps to be taken to keep it cleaner and dryer. And if you are like me, you always have too many birds, so giving some away might be good. Sorry that you are dealing with this, but I would talk to my vet about what to do to prevent this.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. MacCana

    MacCana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    See thats the thing, we don't have any vets around here that know anything about chickens. They won't even try. I disinfect my flock's water bowl every other day with a bleach - water solution and once a week with their feeder.
    The lab has been good so far about answering the phone & fielding my questions, so once I get the other test in I'll do that also.


    That is good to hear about it not passing through to the egg. Maybe at least we'll get to keep the new baby silkie that hatched about 4 days ago. It hasn't been outside & I have been practicing good biosecurity with it.... That comment about the cocci makes sense. They had a slight bout with it a while back. But no one died or got real down bc I recognized it and began treatment almost immediately. From my understanding, enteritis can be passed from bird to bird through poo. The source was a local chicken. I bought & brought it home and within 2 days had culled it for signs of illness. It was too late though bc my guineas and a rooster wouldn't keep away from her quarantine cage during free ranging. They had access to the ground around her twice before I began supervising free range time to keep them away from her. I had had her in a drop-down cage that I moved around a certain part of my yard daily. I believe thats where it came from. Given my chickens had had cocci in the past, they must've just picked it right up. I can't see over crowding or enclosure being the problem. I spend at least an hour on their maintenance a day. I have 3 pullets in a 9x6x4 chicken tractor and the adults are in a 10x10 dog kennel. They are kept on the deep litter method, which i stir weekly or after it rains, and all are free ranged during the day. I only have 13 chooks in the kennel. Which is roofed with heavy outdoor tarp. I guess my chickens have just all passed it amongst each other? I'd be afraid not to de-populate at this point, since everyone is in such close proximity to each other daily, I wouldn't be able to be sure who has it and who doesn't. It's really unfortunate this happened. My sister in law can keep hers in cages on mucky, dirt floors and feed crushed corn and never have problems...I take good care of mine & they get sick on me. Bluh. Thanks though. You guys have been helping me navigate what decisions I need to be making. Does this junk get into the ground? I plan on waiting until close to spring before getting anything new
     
  8. MacCana

    MacCana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And by the way, I feed mine a GMO free layer mini pellet from a feed mill about 1.5 hours from here. I don't feed cracked corn like my sister in law lol. Just wanted to clarify. They also get choice of oyster shells.
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Are your other birds healthy?

    -Kathy
     
  10. MacCana

    MacCana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    75% of my flock has shown the same symptoms noticed in rooster sent off for testing. His symptoms were the worst out of everyone, and was only a slight, clear runny nose and sounding "rackety". And occasional runny poo. No loss in apetite, thirst, or listlessness. None have died from this. None of my chickens have shown any more signs in about a week now. Without any medication.

    I just received the rooster's report. I'll paste. Looking forward to your thoughts Kathy. I have come across many threads where you were able to weigh in on such things, and you seem to know your biz.
    I referred to your guide for shipping when I sent mine btw.

    I know the outlook is bleak. I am 95% sure I will be de-populating.
    But here...you tell me...

    Purpose of Test:
    Diagnostic

    Animal Information:
    Chicken ; AVIAN - Chicken

    Diagnosis:
    Bacterial Enteritis
    Cryptosporidiosis
    Tracheitis, mild


    Final Diagnosis Comment:
    Histopathological findings were consistent with bacterial enteritis and cryptosporidiosis. Additional findings include a mild tracheitis. Mycoplasma sp. was isolated from trachea. Mycoplasma can cause chronic respiratory disease and very low mortality rate in uncomplicated cases. The infection in this bird is considered mild, and reduced weight gain and lower egg production are expected. The FA for Chlamydia is negative, and the AI test is negative (see results below).
    Consultation with your veterinarian is recommended for prevention and treatment options.


    Gross Examination:
    Presented is a reportedly adult rooster in good body condition with mild postmortem autolysis. On general examination,
    the neck is fractured with associated hemorrhage (euthanasia). Upon opening the body, there is multiorgan congestion
    (common postmortem finding). The liver is pale. No other significant gross findings are observed in the body.


    Gross Examination Diagnosis:
    Euthanasia

    Gross Examination Comments:
    There were not significant gross findings.

    Histopathology:
    Multiple tissues including brain, peripheral nerves, Bursa' s of Fabricius, lung, kidney, heart, liver, ventriculus and
    intestine are examined. Sections from intestine are moderately thickened by lymphocytes, plasma cells and lesser
    heterophils within the lamina propria. The villi is diffusely blunted. Large numbers of rod and bacilli bacteria are present
    within the surface. Crypts are occasionally dilated and lined by irregularly round basophilic protozoal organisms consistent with Cryptosporidium sp. The liver has small numbers of heterophils within portal areas (mild hepatitis). The trachea is multifocally infiltrated by small numbers of histiocytes and lymphocytes (mild tracheitis) but intranuclear inclusion bodies or microorganisms are not seen. Blood vessels within multiple tissues are occasionally surrounded by small numbers of heterophils. Remaining tissues are unremarkable.


    Lab Findings

    Bacteriology:
    Sample
    Test Name
    Organism
    Quantifier

    Chicken - AVIAN - Chicken
    Trachea - Swab/Culturette - 1
    Mycoplasma spp. Culture
    Mycoplasma sp.: Moderate Numbers


    Chicken - AVIAN - Chicken
    Liver - Fresh Tissue - 2
    Aerobic Culture Farm: No Growth

    Lung - Fresh Tissue - 3
    Aerobic Culture Farm: No Significant Growth
    No Haemophilus sp. isolated


    Intestine - Swab/Culturette - 4
    Aerobic Culture Farm: No Significant Growth

    Immunology

    Chicken - AVIAN - Chicken
    Liver - Fresh Tissue - 2
    Chlamydia - FA (Farm): Negative

    Lung - Fresh Tissue - 3
    Chlamydia - FA (Farm): Negative

    Spleen - Fresh Tissue - 5
    Chlamydia - FA (Farm): Negative

    Molecular Diagnostics

    Test Name: AI Matrix
    Chicken - AVIAN - Chicken

    Oropharyngeal Swab - 6
    Avian Influenza PCR (PCR): Negative
     

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