Limping chicken / funky eggs

RedLionChooks

Chirping
May 20, 2019
63
86
81
Kennett Square, PA
Some greens can interfere with absorption of calcium. Spinach, collard greens, chard contain higher levels of oxalates (oxalic acid) which is what interferes with calcium, so should be given sparingly. Scratch and Peck feeds are whole grain, and some birds will pick and choose the bits they like, leaving the rest, which can sometimes lead to deficiencies. A pellet or crumble type feed doesn't let them do that. Just putting those out there as possible contributors.

Excellent information here - thank you! Will take this into consideration regarding the greens. I do soak / ferment the Scratch and Peck. I really appreciate a non-processed food, just like for me : )
 

RedLionChooks

Chirping
May 20, 2019
63
86
81
Kennett Square, PA
Us it possible the leg is sore and not the foot? Try gently feeling entire leg for tender spots, lumps, etc... look for other injuries besides possible bumblefoot. If the foot looks healthy, I always look for other possibilities, leg, hip joints.would large or extra large eggs cause hip pain or possible dislocation?
Hello, thank you for this feedback. I did check the leg last evening, comparing to the other. While I am not an orthopedist by any stretch, I did not notice anything. The pad on the affected foot does feel slightly puffier than the other, but not hard, no redness, no visible lump or cut. I will continue to check on her, and soak the foot. I did find another rubber egg under her roost this morning, so I am assuming these are connected. Her eggs have been telling signs of something out of the ordinary for at least 7-10 days.
 

RedLionChooks

Chirping
May 20, 2019
63
86
81
Kennett Square, PA
Because they are not likely to be effective and can cause, or mask, other problems.

If I thought my birds had a worm problem I would have fecal floats done to determine if, what, and how many, then use an appropriate chemical wormer.


On the limping, I have had several limpers, only a couple bad enough to 'treat'.
Even once they are well enough to eat and drink and get around effectively,
it can take weeks for strain/sprain to fully heal.
If limp is really bothering them by inhibiting their normal activities too much, I will isolate them in a crate to 'force' rest for a day or two. Letting them out late in day, an hour before roost time, to give them a stretch and evaluate their mobility, then decide if they need another day and put them back in crate off roost after dark. Repeat stretch and eval the next day until they are better. Keep crate in coop so bird can remain 'with' the flock.
Thanks AART. Given I am inexperienced, what constitutes a worm problem? I thought that all birds / animals have some level of worms. If the flock is healthy and kept under properly managed conditions, that they can manage on their own, or with some supplements. I really like to save the chemicals for a serious problem (following my own health routine).

I guess since she is laying rubber eggs - laid another one from the roost last night - combined with limping, I should suspect they are related in some way. The pad of the affected foot feels somewhat puffier than the other, though it is so hard to say, because it looks perfectly normal. There is no hardness. I will continue to soak, in case it is bumblefoot, in hopes that early detection and treatment will help the outcome if it is bumblefoot.

Each of these experiences helps me become a better chicken keeper, but the research and care constitute a 3/4 time job! I do love learning about proper management and care, and appreciate your experienced feedback - thank you!
 

aart

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I thought that all birds / animals have some level of worms. If the flock is healthy and kept under properly managed conditions, that they can manage on their own, or with some supplements
That's my thought, I rarely treat a bird for anything unless it's obvious and extreme.
I don't give supplements or over-analyze every little thing and avoid jumping to conclusions.
Good ration, plain water, good housing with observation to detect if any 'problem' can be easily rectified.
 

coach723

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With all due respect to differing opinions, since roundworms were seen in the droppings, there are no conclusions being jumped to in regards to a parasite being present. If it were only suspected I would recommend getting a fecal float done to rule in or rule out the presence of parasites. Since evidence was seen, I would worm.

She has also had some diarrhea with what appeared to be a few round worms last week.

How often a flock should be wormed is very dependent on many variables, and no two flocks are the same. But having dealt with very sick birds, and having lost birds, whose only underlying health issue was roundworm, I would personally recommend treating them for what is known. There is no way to know what any outcome would be for sure, every case is different, but it's well documented that it can cause reduced weight/reduced feed efficiency, reduced egg production, secondary infection to damaged digestive tract, and weaken the bird(s) and impact overall health.
 

RedLionChooks

Chirping
May 20, 2019
63
86
81
Kennett Square, PA
That's my thought, I rarely treat a bird for anything unless it's obvious and extreme.
I don't give supplements or over-analyze every little thing and avoid jumping to conclusions.
Good ration, plain water, good housing with observation to detect if any 'problem' can be easily rectified.
That is very helpful. My understanding - from reading, not from experience - is that there will be diarrhea, weight loss, pale combs, drop in lay lethargy, etc if there is a load of worms that has accelerated out of hand. If this is seen, measures should be taken to intervene. I do keep a close eye on the flock with everyday management practices in place - cleaning up, feeding, collecting eggs, changing water, etc. I can tell when something is 'off' with regard to how a bird is acting. It can be easy to overanalyze when I don't know what's what : ) So it is helpful to hear from you and others to guide us in the brooder along. Thanks again : )
 

RedLionChooks

Chirping
May 20, 2019
63
86
81
Kennett Square, PA
With all due respect to differing opinions, since roundworms were seen in the droppings, there are no conclusions being jumped to in regards to a parasite being present. If it were only suspected I would recommend getting a fecal float done to rule in or rule out the presence of parasites. Since evidence was seen, I would worm.



How often a flock should be wormed is very dependent on many variables, and no two flocks are the same. But having dealt with very sick birds, and having lost birds, whose only underlying health issue was roundworm, I would personally recommend treating them for what is known. There is no way to know what any outcome would be for sure, every case is different, but it's well documented that it can cause reduced weight/reduced feed efficiency, reduced egg production, secondary infection to damaged digestive tract, and weaken the bird(s) and impact overall health.
I can have a test run at the Penn Vet center not far from me. I will give them a call. Can they tell a 'load' amount, or simply the presence? In other words, are recommendations for chemical use based on load, or presence alone?
 

coach723

Free Ranging
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Feb 12, 2015
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With coccidia the count is very important. They generally do a count with all parasites. Different doctors will recommend differently based on numbers present. Roundworm is really easily picked up in the environment, and birds carrying worms are shedding the eggs in their droppings, which will ultimately likely end up with reinfection, and or spread throughout the flock. Some environments are very heavily loaded with parasites, some are less so. Roundworm is a direct infection worm, they pick up the eggs in the environment. Some other parasites, like tapeworm, are picked up by eating a secondary host like a worm or slug or insect, that is infected with the parasite.
http://www.poultrydvm.com/condition/roundworms
 

RedLionChooks

Chirping
May 20, 2019
63
86
81
Kennett Square, PA
With coccidia the count is very important. They generally do a count with all parasites. Different doctors will recommend differently based on numbers present. Roundworm is really easily picked up in the environment, and birds carrying worms are shedding the eggs in their droppings, which will ultimately likely end up with reinfection, and or spread throughout the flock. Some environments are very heavily loaded with parasites, some are less so. Roundworm is a direct infection worm, they pick up the eggs in the environment. Some other parasites, like tapeworm, are picked up by eating a secondary host like a worm or slug or insect, that is infected with the parasite.
http://www.poultrydvm.com/condition/roundworms
I was lucky enough to speak with someone at the avian lab at U Penn. She stated that worms can impact how a chicken absorbs nutrients, and can cause limping - so can coccidiosis. I am going to take several samples over and have them analyzed. In the meantime, if there are other symptoms or changes, I will post them, for guidance, but also so others can learn if there is something useful here. The rest of the flock looks great - no decrease in lay, no symptoms of anything funny. Thanks for all of the feedback - - such a helpful community!
 

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