1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Links/info to Fed/State laws re: birds of prey? advice?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by UrbanFarmerGirl, Jul 31, 2011.

  1. UrbanFarmerGirl

    UrbanFarmerGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    0
    99
    May 18, 2010
    Western Washington
    I have posted previously about a hawk family that has taken up residence in my yard and is hunting my chickens. Here is a link to the previous thread:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=6952912#p6952912

    Just to summarize: 1 parent, 2 juvenile hawks. They live right behind my back fence in a tree. They took my Mamma hen (thin from brooding, probably trying to protect chicks?) and keep coming around to hunt babies and other chickens. I built an enclosed run in a corner of the yard with some tree cover, with bird netting over top, and no longer let them free during the day (the big girls get a couple of semi-supervised hours in the morning or evening). Chickens seem unhappy not to access yard, and egg quality has gone down, but they are safe.

    Yesterday I was sitting in the run, feeding a young marans out of my hand, and the juvenile tried to swoop and grab her out of my lap. It was just a few feet from my head. The birds ran for cover, but the hawk flapped over and tried to perch on the fence/come in through another spot- all the while looking at the chickens. I stood up and walked towards it- easily could have grabbed it through the bird netting. Finally, it flew away.

    Last night I went to lock the chickens up for the night. One of them was somehow out of the coop and run, on top of the bird netting. Not sure if she somehow got there herself, or if the hawk grabbed her through one of the open spots and dropped her? She was ok.

    Anyway, talked to the guys at the feed store and they said the owls/fake hawks do nothing, and reflective stuff does very little aside from making them pause and double check after seeing it the first time. They suggested I use a high power water hose, "bait" them with the little chickens, and sit under tree cover and spray them every time they try to land. This would be possible- they have absolutely no fear of me. He said that all I can do is protect the chickens and 'train' the hawk. Does anyone know if this is allowed? Someone else suggested a potato gun or non-harmful pellet gun, but i don't want to accidentally hurt them and I don't trust my aim. The hose would be effective, but I know there are laws regarding not harming birds of prey or their chicks or nests- and I wouldn't want to. I value the hawks and enjoy watching them, but I want them to hunt rodents instead of my chickens.

    Thanks
    Does anyone have a link or info about whether it is allowed to use detourants such as hoses?
     
  2. cgmccary

    cgmccary Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,740
    216
    211
    Sep 14, 2007
    NE Alabama
    I have hawks nesting nearby and they NEVER bother my chickens. I have juveniles out running around and some that stay out 24/7 (I;m talking small, young chickens). I may be wrong but I attribute my "no hawk problems" to a couple of things:

    (1) Several large Roosters patrolling the area

    and

    (2) 4 adult Toulouse Geese.

    My dog and donkey are a deterrent to other predators, but they wouldn't know a hawk from any other bird.

    If you can, get a large Game Rooster -- he'll take care of the hawk problem.

    Other than keeping your birds well confined, I don't know of another remedy. The hose solution seems awfully time consuming. Who has the time to sit out there with a hose?
     
  3. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

    5,532
    181
    273
    Apr 14, 2011
    Central Oregon
    If you've got holes in your netting large enough for a chicken to get out of, then you need to tighten up your fencing.

    If the hawks never get a meal, they will go and hunt elsewhere. If they live close to your yard, you simply will keep your chickens penned up. If you have a permanent hawk population, you might expand your covered run area so the chickens will have more area.

    You can also put the chickens in tractors during the day if you want them to get out and graze on weeds.
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

    5,545
    223
    288
    Mar 31, 2008
    Grifton NC
    Does anyone know if this is allowed?

    You're not allowed to harm or harrass raptors in any way.

    They are all protected under Federal law.

    Keep your birds penned up for a while and they will leave​
     
  5. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,799
    10
    209
    Jan 12, 2010
    chesapeake Va.
    Quote:You're not allowed to harm or harrass raptors in any way.

    They are all protected under Federal law.

    Keep your birds penned up for a while and they will leave

    It depends on what you have tried to remedy the situation so far you will have to document and report / show FWS you have tried harrassment and so forth but her is the link for obtaining a permit to deal with BOP

    The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (text) (summary) makes it illegal for anyone to take, possess, import, export, transport, sell, purchase, barter, or offer for sale, purchase, or barter, any migratory bird, or the parts, nests, or eggs of such a bird except under the terms of a valid permit issued pursuant to Federal Canada Goose Credit: Tim Bowmanregulations. T



    http://www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-13.pdf

    "Describe the nonlethal measures you have taken to control or eliminate the problem, including how long (e.g., a week, month, year(s)) and how often they have been conducted. List the techniques you have tried, such as harassment (e.g., horns, pyrotechnics, propane cannons), habitat management (e.g., vegetative barriers, longer grass management, fencing), cultural practices (e.g., crop selection and placement, management of pets and feeding schedules), or no feeding policies. "

    you are going to have to prove all this was tried first they can and will issue permits depending on species but this will need to be documented do not be surprised if FWS wants to inspect your farm good luck with your problem
     
  6. 1320

    1320 Out Of The Brooder

    41
    0
    22
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sounds like harassment IS legal......
     
  7. UrbanFarmerGirl

    UrbanFarmerGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    0
    99
    May 18, 2010
    Western Washington
    I agree it does sound like harassment is encouraged, so that birds are encouraged to move on rather than get to this phase of requesting to exterminate them. I do not have such a severe issue that I would ever consider a special permit... I just want to know if the hose thing is allowed. If you can use pyrotechnics I feel like water is reasonable.
     
  8. cooper38

    cooper38 Out Of The Brooder

    61
    0
    29
    Apr 22, 2011
    Deep Gap, NC
    Just invite some crows over.
     
  9. UrbanFarmerGirl

    UrbanFarmerGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    0
    99
    May 18, 2010
    Western Washington
    Strangely and suddenly the entire family of hawks (3) are gone. After a month of constant kree-kree noise from sun up to sun down, and perching and staring and flying all around my yard, today they are silent, and not in the sky. I hope they have moved on. Maybe it was time to fledge and leave the nest.
     
  10. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

    5,545
    223
    288
    Mar 31, 2008
    Grifton NC
    It depends on what you have tried to remedy the situation so far you will have to document and report / show FWS you have tried harrassment and so forth but her is the link for obtaining a permit to deal with BOP

    The first thing you have to prove to get a permit is that you have "exhausted ALL other means" for solving the problem.

    One of those means would be better containment of your birds.
    Very few depredation permits are actually issued for raptors​
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by