Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder (Picture Heavy) - UPDATE

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Blooie, Mar 4, 2015.

  1. chicapee

    chicapee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New babies first night in the brooder. They love it.
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. alibabba

    alibabba Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I love it too, very clean looking...

    not for long lol lol lol.
     
  3. alibabba

    alibabba Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow, that is quite brave, and so of course being as aware you are, you will defiinitely take all the proper precautions. But how wonderful for the opportunity to share information with others open to different ideas and suggestions! Go Chicken Ron and Bev!!!
     
  4. alibabba

    alibabba Chillin' With My Peeps

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    can you turn it upside down? i have smaller weaker chicks inside doing great with heat pad on the bottom (covered wirh towels) and then the rack on top with another towel on top.
     
  5. alibabba

    alibabba Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "
     
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    I brooded 22 chicks with the large pad. They were hatched May 6, and went outside shortly after hatch. They did fine. By 3 weeks old, they were choosing to bed down beside it at night. They made a nice big carpet of fluff. When I put my hand into the carpet, it was warm! In fact, they went into the cave for quick warm ups during the day, but slept in a pig pile outside the pad at night.
     
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  7. COChix

    COChix Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree with your comments about the chicks needing the heat source, I.e., underneath the heat source, as I have seen this first hand. First with the Fifteen we hatch in April, I was late coming to the thread, so they lived under a heat lamp for the first 9 days. Then I switched them cold turkey to my MHP set up. By that time, they spent most of their days on top and diving from the top as well as playing king of the hill. They slept under it at night, but even then some where at the very outskirts of the front For the cave, it all happens so fast. By week three ours MHP was down to 1 and they were outside in the small coop by week two. Upper 40's at night.


    Nice job, happy chicks. Yeah!
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2015
  8. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    What a great setup! Wait until you see how fast they outdo everything you've ever read about chicks!! Won't need heat for long, won't need to get used to night/day cycles and will be so curious about their environment! Glad you took the plunge!
     
  9. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    for what its worth My grandpa used to brood chicks with a heat source that came from underneath....

    He take a sheet of corrugated tin and make a frame around it probably about eighteen inches deep. Then he would fill the bottom of the brooder with Blow sand from the desert. Blow sand gathers around objects that stop the wind... its as fine as talc.

    Then he would set up kerosine heaters under the tin.... Dad said they would brood a couple hundred at a time that way. Dad smiled as he told of how the little Peechuckers (his term for them) would stretch out in the sand and fall asleeep.

    deb
     
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  10. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    Now isn't that a terrific anecdote! Brooding large numbers of chicks has always interested me, not that I'd ever need to do it.

    My uncle had a chicken farm in Lucerne Valley, CA, and he used those big umbrella brooders that I believe operated on kerosene. The chicks all huddled underneath. He raised the brooders as the chicks grew and needed less heat. He had several of these in each barn, and they measured around five feet in diameter. He had three or four huge barns. Thousands of chicks.

    My five cousins never once made a pet out of a single chicken the entire time they were growing up on that chicken farm. He gave me and my sisters some chicks one time to bring home and raise, but weasels got them the first night.

    Ah, memories.
     

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