MG in flock. Trying to be responsible....

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bootsNbirds, Sep 7, 2014.

  1. bootsNbirds

    bootsNbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 13, 2014
    Madera, CA
    My Coop
    After a month of sneezes & frantic research, I think my flock has MG.

    I can't describe the distress this has caused me, both financially and most emotionally, so I won't dwell on that. But I want to be responsible; so am destroying the entire flock. My mother's turkeys, and the quail will follow them to freezer-land.

    I'm only keeping the younger layers long enough to get some eggs, and make back a little money to pay for the new flock. (of course this would happen JUST as they're reaching laying age!) My grandfather has a piece of land far from any animals, where I'll move these "Death Row" chickens. That way I can scorch and bleach and disinfect my property.

    My questions are these:

    1. Are the turkeys safe to eat? One source I read said that turkeys with "airsacculitis" resultant from MG are not suitable for consumption, but I haven't been able to find a good definition of what airsacculitis looks like in the carcass, or while they're still alive. They are not showing any MG symptoms, but it's more than likely that they have it, as they're housed near the affected chickens.

    2. Would it be terribly, horribly irresponsible to give my handful of pet fancy chickens away? With complete disclosure about the MG & to someone who would keep a closed, bio-secure flock? Maybe someone who wants them just for eggs, so no chance of breeding MG+ birds. I just can't fathom the thought of killing my friendly babies! [​IMG] But if I have to, I have to.
     
  2. bootsNbirds

    bootsNbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    3
    58
    Aug 13, 2014
    Madera, CA
    My Coop
    Forgot to mention, the pet birds are asymptomatic and nowhere near the other birds. But I didn't used to change my shoes between pens, so they could be carriers. :(
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Is sneezing the only symptom they had/have? If so, it could have been environmental or it could be any one of many possible respiratory diseases. There is no way to know without testing. I would suggest that instead of killing off every bird on the place, maybe first sacrifice one that did/does have symptoms and get a necropsy done at a state lab. They do them for free here in CA and then you will know for sure exactly what might have been going on in your flock and how best to proceed. There is a state poultry pathology lab in Turlock but there may be one closer to you, I don't know. If there isn't one close enough to drive to you can also FedEx them a freshly culled bird. If you contact them they can walk you through the process. It would be well worth it to have the answers.

    As far as giving away the pet birds who have never shown symptoms? I guess that's judgment call on your part if the people you are giving them to are fully aware of the situation and educated re poultry diseases. But again, I'd get a bird tested before making any decisions.
     
  4. bootsNbirds

    bootsNbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

    101
    3
    58
    Aug 13, 2014
    Madera, CA
    My Coop
    Thanks @cafarmgirl I didn't know they would do the testing for free... I may do that with an extra roo that's been in with the pets. Then at least I;d know for sure about them.
    It started as just sneezing, but now some in the flock also has congested, rattling chests, coughs, and I pulled one bird out that had watery, bubbling eyes. :/ All symptoms of MG, according to this site & a few others.
     

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