My experience with bumblefoot

WhiteWyan

Songster
May 17, 2017
488
600
206
Ulster Park
Hi everyone,

I wanted to share with you today about the bumble foot I just attempted to treat.
I don't have any pictures but it wouldn't be anything you haven't seen before on the forums about bumblefoot.

My 1.5 yr old silver laced wyandotte started showing signs of swelling in the webbing between 2 of her toes on her left foot a couple months ago. I didn't think it was much to worry about so I did nothing! Big mistake. I should have taken care of this earlier but I didn't know better. I waited.

I waited until today. It never seemed very red or inflamed. Just pink and... ever steadily growing larger. It got to the point that the bumble emerged out of the top of her webbing and was visible as a cream colored "scab".

I soaked her feet in the tub with warm Epsom water for 45 minutes. I cleansed the skin with iodine and tried to wrap her in a towel and put her on her side. That was a little tough but she eventually got in a good spot.

That bumble is HARD. I have some advice from my experience. Use an 18 g needle to excavate the bumble. Use a drilling motion because the pulling/chipping technique is never going to get you anywhere.

I would describe a bumble to be almost exactly like a dilated pore of winer. Have you seen these videos online of these dermatologists taking these out? They usually come clean out but they have anaesthetic and scalpels and sutures.

If I had the skill and materials I probably would have cut her skin in between the toes and got it all out like that. I would have had to stitch her and I couldn't do that without anaesthetic.

Overall I would say the soaking helped. The drilling helped. I got as much out as I could, she bled a little bit. I flushed the wound completely with nutritive wound spray (poultry wound spray with lanolin). Then I rubbed neosporin all up in there and on top of her foot. Wrapped in a strip of gauze and then vet wrap. Sealed the end of the vet wrap with a little narrow strip of duct tape up around the "ankle" of her foot.

She seems good so far. I am going to be checking the foot in a couple days to soak and excavate again. I will try to get pictures to show my progress!

Thanks for reading.
 

staceyj

Enabler
Jan 1, 2017
7,998
45,721
1,152
Coastal NC
My Coop
My Coop
I feel your pain.
My experience:
Two of my birds are welsummers and I don’t know what it is that makes them so different from the rest but I am almost always dealing with bumblefoot in one or the other of them.

I have gotten much more aggressive in treating it sooner and more completely than I did when I first got into this game and am having a much better and faster positive response as a result.
 

staceyj

Enabler
Jan 1, 2017
7,998
45,721
1,152
Coastal NC
My Coop
My Coop
Hi everyone,

I wanted to share with you today about the bumble foot I just attempted to treat.
I don't have any pictures but it wouldn't be anything you haven't seen before on the forums about bumblefoot.

My 1.5 yr old silver laced wyandotte started showing signs of swelling in the webbing between 2 of her toes on her left foot a couple months ago. I didn't think it was much to worry about so I did nothing! Big mistake. I should have taken care of this earlier but I didn't know better. I waited.

I waited until today. It never seemed very red or inflamed. Just pink and... ever steadily growing larger. It got to the point that the bumble emerged out of the top of her webbing and was visible as a cream colored "scab".

I soaked her feet in the tub with warm Epsom water for 45 minutes. I cleansed the skin with iodine and tried to wrap her in a towel and put her on her side. That was a little tough but she eventually got in a good spot.

That bumble is HARD. I have some advice from my experience. Use an 18 g needle to excavate the bumble. Use a drilling motion because the pulling/chipping technique is never going to get you anywhere.

I would describe a bumble to be almost exactly like a dilated pore of winer. Have you seen these videos online of these dermatologists taking these out? They usually come clean out but they have anaesthetic and scalpels and sutures.

If I had the skill and materials I probably would have cut her skin in between the toes and got it all out like that. I would have had to stitch her and I couldn't do that without anaesthetic.

Overall I would say the soaking helped. The drilling helped. I got as much out as I could, she bled a little bit. I flushed the wound completely with nutritive wound spray (poultry wound spray with lanolin). Then I rubbed neosporin all up in there and on top of her foot. Wrapped in a strip of gauze and then vet wrap. Sealed the end of the vet wrap with a little narrow strip of duct tape up around the "ankle" of her foot.

She seems good so far. I am going to be checking the foot in a couple days to soak and excavate again. I will try to get pictures to show my progress!

Thanks for reading.

How does the bottom of her foot look?


If you cut you do not have to stitch.
If fact you don’t want to close up that wound with stitches.
Bumblefoot is usually a staph infection.

And because of that, I suggest wearing gloves when working on them. I know some people don’t but I do.

Closing the wound too soon traps in germs and doesn’t allow for gradual healing from the inside out and leaves potential for an extensive invasive infection.

Soaking , retreating and fresh bandages ever day-every other- every two....
Is IMHO the best way to heal.
 

staceyj

Enabler
Jan 1, 2017
7,998
45,721
1,152
Coastal NC
My Coop
My Coop
Here’s a great tip. When wrapping her foot with vet wrap, use a piece about 12- 15 inches long (unstretched)x 3/4 inch wide.
I buy the 4 inch rolls and cut it.
start and end at the ankle.

When you have wrapped the foot and still have a few inches left, snip the tape in the center and pull. It will tear nearly into two strips. Then you can bring it around the ankle and tie it in a (*not tight) double knot like a string bracelet to keep it on until you’re ready to cut it off.
 

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