1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

My first try at home building a Chicken abode (after reading for months all about chickens)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Indoroowet, Oct 9, 2014.

  1. Indoroowet

    Indoroowet Out Of The Brooder

    69
    5
    31
    Oct 9, 2014
    Nothern Utah
    [​IMG]

    I chose a triangular shape, because that is the easiest shape to make which is stable.
    (No need for braces or trusses)
    The raw materials are all stock size or stock length,
    like 4 x 8 feet plywood and 10 foot long electrical conduit,
    and cut into two pieces - no waste !
    The floor size of the coop is 4 x 4 feet,
    and consists out of 2 plastic drain pans for a washing machine.
    These can be removed, by removing the egg laying box away from the coop,
    for cleaning and washing off.
    The run behind it is 5 x 20 feet.

    The blue tarp is there for the time being to give the hens
    a bit more shade where they can rest,
    instead of *only under* the coop.
    I will replace that next year with some movable wooden covers.
    Movable meaning they will act as a lift up cover, hinged on the top.

    In the top of the coop are six 2 inch diameter vent holes,
    three on each end.

    This is my first year with chickens ...
    Started with four 5 day-old hatchlings (?),
    but some neighbour hood dogs killed one of them.
     
  2. bigmrg74

    bigmrg74 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,367
    279
    216
    Jan 28, 2014
    Clinton Michigan
    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. AkChris

    AkChris Chillin' With My Peeps

    86
    21
    64
    May 20, 2014
    SE Alaska
    Looks like a nice A-frame design. I like the paint job.

    I'll stay out of the debate about the use of chicken wire vs hardware cloth.
     
  4. vbob99

    vbob99 Out Of The Brooder

    36
    3
    25
    Mar 22, 2014
    cure for chicken wire is eeelectri-c-ity simple fast and not that expensive, especially since opp made a simple design with basically only one way at coop (ground level).
    looks good, how about using the clear plastic "tin" to cover some of the tarp area. it would cover from wind and rain but allow sunlight, but will eventually wear out.
     
  5. Indoroowet

    Indoroowet Out Of The Brooder

    69
    5
    31
    Oct 9, 2014
    Nothern Utah
    Please elaborate on *eeelectri-c-ity simple fast and not that expensive*.
    Any suggestions ?

    <<how about using the clear plastic "tin" to cover some of the tarp area. it would cover from wind and rain but allow sunlight, but will eventually wear out.>>

    I wrote :
    **The blue tarp is there for the time being to give the hens
    a bit more shade where they can rest, instead of *only under* the coop.
    I will replace that next year with some movable wooden covers.
    Movable meaning they will act as a lift up cover, hinged on the top.**

    (I have to take some pics of the idea of it to illustrate, I guess ?)

    What is *clear plastic "tin"* ?
    I do not see where the chickens need *more* sunlight, as what they now get in the 15 feet of open run they have now ? Total run area behind coop is 20 feet long.
    The daytime temps are still in the high 80 to low 90's ... for maybe another month or so.

    TIA
     
  6. aatx

    aatx Chillin' With My Peeps

    333
    35
    103
    Mar 19, 2014
    Erath County, Texas
    I'd be mostly concerned with ventilation. A couple of 2" vent holes on each end is no where near adequate. You'll need some real openings, covered with hardware cloth. Even in the winter, ventilation is very important.
     
  7. bdjh

    bdjh Chillin' With My Peeps

    126
    15
    83
    Aug 7, 2013
    Winnipeg
    I think it's a great-looking coop.

    As far as the chicken wire goes, it really depends on what's in your area. If you've got critters trying to get at your girls on a nightly basis, especially if you're not locking them securely in their coop, then sure, the heavy-duty stuff is a must.

    The only real predators we have are coyotes and wolves, which are strictly night-time predators.

    We lock our girls up tight at night, so unless the critters here in Canada have thumbs or access to power tools, they aren't getting near them.

    And in the two years we've had chickens, we've only had one critter try to get into the run, which was a skunk a couple of weeks ago. It stopped, however, as soon as it hit the chicken wire that I buried as a 'skirt' around the bottom of the run.

    So, in our area (near Winnipeg), the wire is more for keeping the chickens IN than critters OUT.
     
  8. vbob99

    vbob99 Out Of The Brooder

    36
    3
    25
    Mar 22, 2014
    electric fencer and wire run with insulators along the very bottom of coop but just high enough up it wont short out. another run of electric fence wire about the height a fox/coyote/dog/raccoon would place its front feet when hopping up onto coop. cost for one fence charger and wire shouldn't be too high.

    since you already know you will have dog problems i would do electric fence as soon as affordable

    as far as the "tin" all it is is a clearish plastic sheet of roofing used mainly for green house construction, not really anything other than random idea. as far as i would be concerned the tarp works but so would the hinged top, all in what works best for you
     
  9. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    I fully beg to differ, although wolves and coyotes might prefer twilight or night hunting they are not fully nocturnal hunters and they will hunt during the day if opportunity arises... This is especially prevalent during food shortages, bad weather or during baby rearing seasons... I see coyotes and racoons roaming around my property A LOT during the day in the winter months, so much so that I now carry a sidearm almost all the time during the winter months when I head out to care for the livestock... Domestic or wild dogs will hunt all day long, as will again say a raccoon if opportunity arises and they are hungry... All these predators can and will chew or claw through traditional chicken wire given the chance and determination to do so...

    IMO using it and calling it 'safe' is equivalent to never looking left last before crossing a road and calling the lack of being run over proof that it's safe to do so... It's only a matter of time, IMO... I'm not saying that it'a a horrible option, as it will deter many predators, but there are much better options that have a much more proven and better track record...
     
  10. bdjh

    bdjh Chillin' With My Peeps

    126
    15
    83
    Aug 7, 2013
    Winnipeg
    I completely understand....I'm only talking from my perspective. Where we are, you don't see the wolves and coyotes during the day......and they certainly wouldn't come into our semi-populated areas in daylight.

    At night, however, I've heard them panting outside my window........but for some strange reason, they've never tried to get into the coop. They prefer the dogs and cats that stupid people leave outside all night in the cold.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by