My roo is getting FRISKY

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by MamaHauk, Aug 3, 2016.

  1. MamaHauk

    MamaHauk In the Brooder

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    Mar 30, 2016
    Last spring, we got three chicks from a feed store. They were all supposed to be girls….but one of them is a roo… Recently, he's started getting frisky with the ladies. I REALLY don't want chicks right now. Nor do I want to eat fertilized eggs. So I secluded him in the small coop next to the big coop. They can still see each other. Is separating him from his girls going to cause any problems?


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  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Shouldn't hurt him. Although I can't see any reason it would matter. Chicks don't spontaneously occur - you'd have to incubate the eggs for 21 days before they could even hatch. And fertile eggs taste and look identical to infertile eggs.
     
  3. MamaHauk

    MamaHauk In the Brooder

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    I know. But I still can't bring myself to eat/sell fertilized eggs. ;)
     
  4. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    I can respect that. I was really grossed out when I first started eating fertilized eggs. But I can't help but ask, why keep him instead of rehoming? While it's not exactly hurting him to be separate from the flock, I've found cockbirds to be much happier when they are able to interact with their hens.
     
  5. chickentvforme

    chickentvforme Chirping

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    I just started keeping chickens a year ago and ended up with a rooster accidently too. I was really freaked out about eating eggs out of my backyard let alone fertilized ones. However I made a cake with them once and quickly realized that there is no difference. Just try and see if you can tolerate trying it once. The poor guy is designed to be a flock/group type of animal. They get lonely. He would be better suited to live with the ladies or at least another fella.
     
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  6. MamaHauk

    MamaHauk In the Brooder

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    My kids are too attached... :/
     
  7. Peeps61

    Peeps61 Songster

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    My experience in separating roosters from the hens is that they spend most of their time trying to get to the girls and are not very happy if they can see them, but not be with them. He might be happier with another rooster as a companion, but then you'd have two.....

    I can guarantee you that fertile eggs are exactly the same in looks and taste as non-fertile eggs. I eat and sell mine. The only way you'll get chicks is if a hen goes broody and sits on the eggs for at least 3 weeks AND you allow her to. Most of us collect our eggs daily, so if you do that, the chicks won't be an issue.

    Also, certain breeds are known for broodiness or non-broodiness. What kind of birds are in your small flock?
     
  8. MamaHauk

    MamaHauk In the Brooder

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    The roo is a Rhode Island Red. My hens are a Rhode Island red, a welsummer, and I have two older hens that are brown leghorns.
     
  9. I personally wouldn't keep a rooster separate from the girls. It seems like a strange form or torture, every fiber of his being wants to be with them. Do not get another rooster, that's just a very bad idea. Adult roosters would not get along in this situation. The new one would be seen as an intruder.
    I agree with everyone above, fertile eggs are exactly like unfirtle ones in every aspect. They won't develop in your fridge or even on your counter, you're not going to get a surprise embryo in your breakfast, it takes a hen's 104° (at broody peak) temperature 21 days to hatch an egg. If you want to keep him you should allow him to live with the girls or move him out of sight, and I'm not sure that will help.
    Imagine living your life with a fence between you and your significant other. While they don't feel deep love as we do, they're instinctual need to mate is probably just as strong, for them. All the hens I've ever had have been happier with a GOOD rooster as well.
    Edited foe typos. Sorry if I missed some.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2016
    1 person likes this.

  10. MamaHauk

    MamaHauk In the Brooder

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    Thanks, all, for the input!
     

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