New pullets - one dead, one sneezing

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lindsay44, Oct 12, 2014.

  1. lindsay44

    lindsay44 Out Of The Brooder

    I got three new pullets (one gold laced and two silver laced Wyandottes) just over 2 weeks ago. They are in a smaller coop separate from my other girls as I planned to keep them quarantined for a month just in case.

    I noticed the gold one sneezing occasionally within a day or two but all three were peppy and eating and drinking as they should so I didn't pay it too much mind. One of the silver ones didn't grow like the others though - she stayed really tiny and over the last two days went from very peppy to lethargic. I gave her vitamins but didn't separate them and found her dead in the coop this morning. I feel awful for not bringing her in but I honestly didn't think it was that bad. I had a feeling something was weird with her the whole time as she was tiny but don't have much experience with younger birds so wasn't sure.

    Now, the gold one is still sneezing. The other one looks fine but I am worried that they will meet the same fate. I have given the coop a thorough cleaning and am giving them Nutri drench and extra protein. They don't seem too perky though.

    Does anyone have any ideas what this could be? We are in Ontario, Canada and it's gotten chilly the last couple nights but the coop is dry and draft free so I don't think that's it.

    Any tips on how to best look after them would be much appreciated. I really don't want the same nasty surprise when I open the coop tomorrow. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Chicken Obsessed Staff Member Premium Member

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    I'm afraid this is just why you quarantine birds, in case they have a respiratory disease. Many experienced chicken keepers would cull them at this point. If you put them with your othres, it is highly likely the rest will get whatever they have. The only way to be certain what they have is lab testing. In the US this is often done by an ag college or through a state vet's office; I'm afraid I have no idea how to get it done in Canada.

    Here's an overview of the common diseaseshere, in case it helps:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
  3. lindsay44

    lindsay44 Out Of The Brooder

    Thanks Judy, I am certainly glad I have quarantined them. I have been quite diligent about keeping everything separate, as I don't want anything to harm my happy, healthy older girls.

    I just went and examined the two pullets and they actually seem ok. I didn't notice any sneezing and they were scratching around and eating. I don't think I can cull them... I will wait to see what happens. If they appear to get worse I'll have to think about it. I would hate to do it but I don't want my big girls getting sick.

    Is it possible that the little one was just a runt? Is that something that even happens with chickens?

    Here are the two pullets - they look all right to me, but any input from more experienced chicken keepers is more than welcome.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The biggest concern is what if they do get better? Then you put them in with the others and what if they are now carriers of whatever they had and give it to your healthy hens? Without having them tested you have no way of knowing if they have something that is going to make your flock sick or not. You can't go by how they look.
     
  5. lindsay44

    lindsay44 Out Of The Brooder

    That's exactly what worries me. I would be afraid to put them in with the others even if they seem fine.

    It's Thanksgiving weekend here so the vet is closed but I will call on Tuesday and see if they will test them. I won't risk the health of the other ones but I would still like to avoid culling them if it's not completely necessary.
     
  6. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good luck! It's a sad thing to deal with for sure.
     
  7. Toddrick

    Toddrick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New to raising chickens here. Trying to learn from others about health issues. Please tell me what the point is of Tylan is as a treatment for respiratory infections, if you just cull any chickens with respiratory infections.
     
  8. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not everyone culls. They seem to think that if the symptoms are gone all is well. Not with some illnesses though. Some have flocks that are sick off and on and they wonder what is wrong...
     
  9. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    If you have a small flock that you intend to keep as a closed flock, no birds, chicks or eggs going out, and no new birds in, some people decide to treat a respiratory illness. I have done that in the past and do not regret it. Several years ago we had an outbreak of infectious bronchitis in my small flock of 8 birds. It spread through all of them but we treated them and they all survived. It did not recurr and we still have some of those birds and they are doing great, other's have passed due to cancers and internal laying issues etc. We did have a bird tested so we knew what we were dealing with however, I think that is very important as some diseases are much harder to manage and just keep coming back. In those cases I do believe it's better to cull then to always have sick birds off and on.
     
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