NO EGGS-NONE

arlenecruises

Chirping
Jan 9, 2016
22
15
52
I have had NO eggs for 6 weeks. Before that very sparse. I have tried every trick on every chicken site to no avail.
I live in Colorado and my neighbor is getting so many eggs that she is selling them. Of course we are getting the same weather temps and sunlight. They look great after increased protein 4 weeks ago, they are eating, drinking, have calcium and plenty of space to roam around all day.
At this point I am wondering if they all have some virus, or bacteria.or bug in them. Very strange that neighbors getting eggs all winter.
We are now getting 11 1/2 hour daylight, plus light on from 3 to daylight

Can a vet do a droppings test?

Any advice appreciated.
 

AlleysChicks

Enabler
Oct 10, 2016
15,213
38,646
1,142
Southern Ohio
My Laying birds took a 3 month break. That includes pullets under a year. 2-3 weeks ago egg production started back.

How old are your birds? Did they molt in the fall? Any hiding places that eggs could be stashed?
 

Nardo

Free Ranging
5 Years
Sep 26, 2014
745
1,738
547
North Texas
My Coop
My Coop
I have had NO eggs for 6 weeks. Before that very sparse. I have tried every trick on every chicken site to no avail.
I live in Colorado and my neighbor is getting so many eggs that she is selling them. Of course we are getting the same weather temps and sunlight. They look great after increased protein 4 weeks ago, they are eating, drinking, have calcium and plenty of space to roam around all day.
At this point I am wondering if they all have some virus, or bacteria.or bug in them. Very strange that neighbors getting eggs all winter.
We are now getting 11 1/2 hour daylight, plus light on from 3 to daylight

Can a vet do a droppings test?

Any advice appreciated.
Does your neighbor have access to your nesting boxes? :lau:gig:oops:
 

lcwmt

Songster
Jun 16, 2017
387
878
214
N Central MT
We are North of you. The pullets quit laying in late December, "some" resumed in early February, using one of the nesting boxes in the coop. They free range so I had looked for nesting spots around the sunny areas where snow had melted or blown off. nada.
Two days ago I took compost out to one of the bins and found almost two weeks worth of eggs from at least two different birds (we get brown eggs and green). Those rascals.
Of course all but that current day's egg were frozen. Yesterday one of the Buffs sat out there for several hours and left a nice egg.
As of yesterday, we know that all of the girls are laying, if not all on the same schedule.
Good luck!
 

theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
May 11, 2010
32,263
19,919
867
Besides sneaky neighbors there are a few things to think about when hens stop laying. Age, breed, diet, disease and parasites. Some breeds stop laying at an early age. Some breeds stop laying during winter months. Some stop laying just because they are past their laying prime. Yes, there are viral and bacterial issues that can cause birds to stop laying but you usually see other symptoms such as weight loss, unthrifty appearance, respiratory issues, odd-looking poop (gotta watch that last one because healthy chickens have funky feces), and sudden death. And don't forget about those little thieves such as rats, snakes and other vermin. Another thing to consider is a hidden nest. Some of those cluckers can really hide a nest. Last but not least you may have an egg-eating chicken somewhere in your flock.

If you want a lot of eggs all year long you need to get a top laying breed such as the Leghorn. Unfortunately, those Olympic layers can succumb to various reproductive complications related to their turbo charged egg factories and don't live long. So you can either get rid of your current flock and buy you some Leghorns, or enjoy what you now have.

Good luck!
 

lcwmt

Songster
Jun 16, 2017
387
878
214
N Central MT
We are North of you. The pullets quit laying in late December, "some" resumed in early February, using one of the nesting boxes in the coop. They free range so I had looked for nesting spots around the sunny areas where snow had melted or blown off. nada.
Two days ago I took compost out to one of the bins and found almost two weeks worth of eggs from at least two different birds (we get brown eggs and green). Those rascals.
Of course all but that current day's egg were frozen. Yesterday one of the Buffs sat out there for several hours and left a nice egg.
As of yesterday, we know that all of the girls are laying, if not all on the same schedule.
Good luck!

*****
and now it is late Friday. A March storm blew in so we were looking for all the girls to be cooped. In the process found the *missing* eggs. Two plus weeks worth, from the Banty and two EE. (all but 3 eggs were cracked/frozen, but now we know where to look)
Those rascals.
 

21hens-incharge

Moderator
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
26,415
109,705
1,672
Northern Colorado
I have had NO eggs for 6 weeks. Before that very sparse. I have tried every trick on every chicken site to no avail.
I live in Colorado and my neighbor is getting so many eggs that she is selling them. Of course we are getting the same weather temps and sunlight. They look great after increased protein 4 weeks ago, they are eating, drinking, have calcium and plenty of space to roam around all day.
At this point I am wondering if they all have some virus, or bacteria.or bug in them. Very strange that neighbors getting eggs all winter.
We are now getting 11 1/2 hour daylight, plus light on from 3 to daylight

Can a vet do a droppings test?

Any advice appreciated.

Howdy neighbor! :frow

We have had temps that allowed mites to move in. Check your birds very closely after dark with a flashlight.

Under the belly, between the legs, arm pits lol, and the ever important vent.

Call around for a vet to do a fecal. Not sure what town you are in.....
 

chickenmeadow

Crowing
10 Years
Jun 14, 2009
1,057
349
276
Southern Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
I just keep a large bin available to my flock at all times & assume that they are always susceptible to having mites (no need to check them for it). My mite mix is with wood ash, sand & a little DE. They ran out of dry mix when some rain water got in the bin; I hadn't seen that it was pushed out of the covered area (now it is secured). We are in a heavily forested area with the coop in a meadow, & are frequented by large flocks of wild turkeys & every other forest animal that can carry mites.

I regret not having my cell phone camera on me a 1/2 hour after replenishing the dry mite mix, & couldn't stop laughing at the sight of the line up of chickens waiting for their turn to dust bathe as they impatiently watched 4 hens squeezed in the bin for a communal bath. They crack me up.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom