Obesity due to Suprelorin implant

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by monalisa9791, Mar 16, 2015.

  1. monalisa9791

    monalisa9791 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 16, 2015
    We have three Rhode Island Red hybrid hens. They all developed egg yolk peritonitis after about one year of laying. They are all now on the Suprelorin implant for the past one-two years. When we went to the vet to renew the implant she said they had put on an enormous amount of weight (from 1.9kg to 2.8 kg). We were just feeding them layer's mash (even though they are not laying anymore)- they just like it a lot. Other treads and forums I researched mention not to feed home- made mixes as they might not provide enough nutrition. The vet said that, since our hens are not laying, they should eat a lower- calorie diet. We don't want to overfeed our hens (I've read about all the risks in relation to hen obesity) but we don't want to under- feed them either. Does anyone have any tips in this regard? Our hens only have part of the day access to grass due to predators,... Your help would be very much appreciated!
     
  2. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    Layer feed is not ideal for non-laying birds, as the higher calcium levels can cause kidney issues. A whole-flock ration would be fine, the calcium and energy levels are lowrr.
     
  3. monalisa9791

    monalisa9791 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi there,

    Thanks very much for your reply.

    My hens and I are based in Ireland and I cannot find a 'whole-flock ration' in our Farmer Coops.

    I spent some time googling 'whole-flock ration' and all flock ration, and did not find a recipe. Does anyone know where I could find such a recipe?

    Since the vet alerted us to the weight issue, I've been doing my best to allow them time to forage on grass, and also took away the layers' mash and replaced it with some wild bird seed grain mix and porridge oats. As the days get longer, they can be out and about in the whole garden, after I get back from work, and feed on insects and other leaves.

    I'm just concerned that I might not have the balance right in their main feed. I would like to provide them with enough food in their coop to keep them healthy but not cause any further weight issues.

    I appreciate any advice that you can give!
     
  4. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    Can you find something like a grower/finisher ration? That would likely work fine - starter rations would be too high in energy.

    Use some caution with seed mixes, seeds and grains like millet, corn and sunflower seeds are very high in fat. Oats would be a good choice, you do not need to cook them, and could be supplemented up to 20% of the ration.

    I would still offer a chicken feed of some kind as the major part of their diet, as what you are feeding now is unfortunately unbalanced.

    You might consider fermented feed -

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/645057/fermented-feeds-anyone-using-them
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  5. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    How did you conclude they had egg yolk peritonitis?
     
  6. monalisa9791

    monalisa9791 Out Of The Brooder

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    The first hen that got egg peritonitis went suddenly really quiet, had translucent/ yellow discharge, only sat down, stopped eating and hadn't layed for a day (at that stage they were laying an egg a day without fail). We brought her to the vet immediately and the vet felt there was an egg stuck inside. She gave her antibiotics immediately and a few days later she passed 'a broken egg' (it had bits of 'scrambled egg' stuck to it too).
    When the other two hens got it, egg yolk was leaking out of their vent, and in one case the vet scooped out some broken egg shell that was still inside.
    Our experience is that they only survive it if taken to the vet straight away and get antibiotics. They were not put on the implant until they layed a few broken eggs, as it was the only way to save them. Apparently it is common enough in hybrids as their bodies are under a lot of strain to produce that 'one egg a day'.
     

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