Official BYC Poll: How Old Is / Was Your Oldest Chicken?

How Old Is / Was Your Oldest Chicken?

  • 0-3 years

    Votes: 100 36.4%
  • 4-7 years

    Votes: 86 31.3%
  • 8-11 years

    Votes: 55 20.0%
  • 12-15 years

    Votes: 26 9.5%
  • 16-19 years

    Votes: 4 1.5%
  • 20 years and older

    Votes: 3 1.1%
  • I don't keep chickens yet

    Votes: 1 0.4%

  • Total voters
    275

BarbaraJean67

Songster
Aug 29, 2020
66
336
116
As Ursula got older, she became a little slower to keep up with the rest of the flock. So when we would go out front to free range. I would carry her out first and the call the rest of the flock out. In the mornings when they were let out to free range the back yard, Ursula was always last to exit the coop, which irritated the Rooster. He would go in and out of the coop clucking at her to hurry and get her butt outside.
Once when we were free ranging the front yard, I called all the chickens in and went back to get Ursula. When I got to the front, Ursula had crossed the street and was high tailing it for the service alley behind the empty lot.
She was running away from home! I guess she was sick of the rooster bothering her. I ran over and got her, gave her some extra love and a few treats and put her back in her favorite place. She never tried to run away again, but I don't think she was very happy that she didn't get away before I got to her.
That is a great story!
 
Sep 27, 2020
364
556
136
Northern California
For this poll, we are curious to see the age ranges of our members' flocks as well as get an idea of the "lifespan" of the older chickens in our community.

How Old Is / Was Your Oldest Chicken? Place your votes above and feel free to share his/her exact age and your experiences in the comments section below.

View attachment 2532362

(Check out more Official BYC Polls HERE!)
My girls are all under a year currently
 

pipdzipdnreadytogo

Dorking Queen
9 Years
Jun 9, 2011
7,948
8,517
536
Indiana
My Coop
My Coop
My very eldest was an old mixed breed rooster who died at 11 years and 3 months or so old. That was about five years ago now. He was one of our very first chickens here and had lost all of his comb tips and a large portion of all of his toes to the early wintertime mistakes we made as first timers with chickens. He had fondly become known as Mr. Toes in his old age as a result. Not sure if I have any pictures of him anymore, but he resembled a Delaware even though he was definitely a mix of mixes.

Next oldest, still living, are Raven and Merlin, a Wyandotte and Easter-egger we picked up at Tractor Supply either late March or early April of 2010. I have confidence they'll surpass Mr. Toes' record at this point, and I hope to see them live much longer still than that. :)

Raven.jpg Merlin.jpg
 

micstrachan

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
Apr 10, 2016
9,558
42,059
1,057
Santa Cruz Mountains, California
My very eldest was an old mixed breed rooster who died at 11 years and 3 months or so old. That was about five years ago now. He was one of our very first chickens here and had lost all of his comb tips and a large portion of all of his toes to the early wintertime mistakes we made as first timers with chickens. He had fondly become known as Mr. Toes in his old age as a result. Not sure if I have any pictures of him anymore, but he resembled a Delaware even though he was definitely a mix of mixes.

Next oldest, still living, are Raven and Merlin, a Wyandotte and Easter-egger we picked up at Tractor Supply either late March or early April of 2010. I have confidence they'll surpass Mr. Toes' record at this point, and I hope to see them live much longer still than that. :)

View attachment 2539400 View attachment 2539399
This gives me hope for my hatchery stock girls!
 

micstrachan

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
Apr 10, 2016
9,558
42,059
1,057
Santa Cruz Mountains, California
Of my original flock of four, only one remains, Bridge, my Barred Rock. She will be five this month and I don’t think she lays.
94E4C548-D1E0-4972-B50E-5953CC2BED15.jpeg

Two died from EYP and one died of fatty liver. I’ve been frantically trying to slim down my flock since. Of my next batch of six, who will be four in May, one has a laying disorder, so I keep her on hormones.

Because of all our predators, mine only get to free range with supervision. I’m sure they would be leaner and healthier if they could free range all the time, but I’m not willing to take that risk. Here they are free ranging yesterday.
8BFA38EC-968E-442B-A83E-42DD6898C2DC.jpeg
D5444605-1A76-4DE8-9E82-3B8BEC0C16A4.jpeg


This thread gives me hope that with improved husbandry, some of my girls can live to a ripe old age.
 
Last edited:

Gallinarium

Songster
Apr 15, 2020
863
2,356
246
America
My oldest hen I think turned four this spring. We kept her from our first flock to mother a batch of fifteen pullets, twelve of which have made it to adulthood.

Only one chick poking out:
1613928152599.png


Her chilling with her adult brood. The EE type in front of her was the exposed chick in the above photo.
1613928202224.png


She's an unknown breed mix that lays tan eggs, I think Orpington mixed with some kind of Mediterranean.
 

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