Opinions and thoughts on my newly constructed Chicken Tractor.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by tjl1388, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. tjl1388

    tjl1388 New Egg

    5
    1
    9
    Jul 27, 2014
    First one and first time with chickens. We move it about every other day so they have fresh grass. As I'm in Central Florida I built a misting system into it today on a timer and they get a gallon block of ice daily. Only have 4 hens and like it that way. Plenty of room for everyone at 48 square ft. Would love to hear thoughts on it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Egg access.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ktn65

    ktn65 Out Of The Brooder

    Looks nice. Is there an easy way to raise and lower the ramp to the nesting boxes? I guess if you are only moving the tractor in the direction of the nesting boxes, the ramp would not need raised.
     
  3. dheltzel

    dheltzel Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    4,163
    707
    261
    Nov 30, 2013
    Pottstown, PA
    Do you get high winds ? If so, how will you keep this from blowing away?
    I've had some trouble with this, that's why I'm asking.
     
  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

    17,018
    5,305
    501
    Mar 9, 2014
    Oregon
    My Coop
    There are several options for anchoring a small tractor such as this - from using heavy blocks (cement) sitting on the surface of the ground outside the coop and anchored to the tractor at all four corners to using anchors driven into the ground (think about it like staking a tent) - it's a matter of what is physically most easy for you (some are better able to move/carry heavy objects than to drive/remove stakes) and most fits your preferences (ie not wanting to punch a bunch of holes in your yard as you move the tractor periodically.
     
  5. tjl1388

    tjl1388 New Egg

    5
    1
    9
    Jul 27, 2014
    The ramp has been trimmed about 6in to clear the grass and I will be drilling into the base in at least one spot to use a horse shoe shaped piece of rebar to anchor it down.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by