Possible prolapse vent in chick.

Bbrothers

In the Brooder
Jan 15, 2020
30
41
33
Ocala, Fl
The chick pooped but is still having trouble. More coconut oil? This was her just now trying to go. Sorry the pictures aren’t great. It was tough to capture without disturbing her.
I thought I noticed that her lower abdomen (pictured) felt a little lumpier than the others. Does it seem big? My husband said he couldn’t really tell if the lumps were any different than the others.
76D083C7-455F-4E12-B599-FEE082382FB4.jpeg
EF746D49-D649-4F60-8400-67AD6B58DF69.jpeg
308E4F84-963A-4BA3-87B3-470277052F9E.jpeg
0267B96B-F4A7-46E5-AAFC-6C36D89DC5EF.jpeg
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,342
22,206
912
Colorado Rockies
Try more coconut oil. She's doing okay right now if she's still active and eating. A chick with a serious blockage will be very lethargic and droopy and even the eyes will be red-rimmed and indicate the chick feels very sick.

If your chick takes a sudden turn for the worse, behaving with the aforementioned symptoms, then I recommend a warm molasses flush to push a possible blockage out of the gizzard. The dose would be an eighth of a cup of warm water with a half a teaspoon of molasses mixed in. You would encourage her to drink it all or syringe it drop by drop into her right side of her beak or directly into her esophagus.
upload_2019-3-15_10-22-30.jpeg
 

Bbrothers

In the Brooder
Jan 15, 2020
30
41
33
Ocala, Fl
Try more coconut oil. She's doing okay right now if she's still active and eating. A chick with a serious blockage will be very lethargic and droopy and even the eyes will be red-rimmed and indicate the chick feels very sick.

If your chick takes a sudden turn for the worse, behaving with the aforementioned symptoms, then I recommend a warm molasses flush to push a possible blockage out of the gizzard. The dose would be an eighth of a cup of warm water with a half a teaspoon of molasses mixed in. You would encourage her to drink it all or syringe it drop by drop into her right side of her beak or directly into her esophagus. View attachment 2004625
Do you recommend keeping her away from the others in case of pecking?
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,342
22,206
912
Colorado Rockies
Pecking the protruding vent is a risk. The tissue is so fragile that the pecking can result in a serious wound you'd need to cope with on top of everything else. On the other hand, a chick removed from its mates doesn't recover from a health issue as easily as one that feels the cohesive support of the group.

I would keep her with the others and keep a close watch on them.
 
Top Bottom