post your chicken coop pictures here!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by chickenlover237, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

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    Custom-made is always better quality. Wish we had your talent. Like I said it is not a design I prefer but certainly appreciate the quality of it!
     
  2. waynem1983

    waynem1983 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yes, my BO's wont use the roost bar even though its only 40cm off the floor, im fitting a cross bar 15cm up to try encourage them, but failing that I will have to tryfit a ramp into an already cramped hut.
     
  3. jtbass2756

    jtbass2756 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    LOLOL..........ya think! I do live in the country and within a township so Rocky Mount can't reach out and get us with its taxes and quirky laws.! Their utility rates are sky high. Those who live within their reach are the ones who are caught between the rock and the hardplace and can't do anything about it!
     
  4. jtbass2756

    jtbass2756 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    If I had the $$ and you were near...I would think a custom built quality would be hands down better and worth the $$
     
  5. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

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    You need more room than the yard in the photo? That's more space than I have in my little cottage back yard LOL!
     
  6. Suzyr

    Suzyr Out Of The Brooder

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    @Sylvester017 Thanks for you reply! The coop has hardware cloth instead of chicken wire, I totally agree that its flimsy, so I specifically asked for the sturdier stuff. Its not on pavers, but I am seeing that is a popular thing to do too. And the nest box actually opens on the side panel with a special lock in place, so its not the typical lift lid type. Overall I really like our little coop, its been great so far, but I am considering building a run on the right side. Right now I let them free range the backyard for a good chunk of the day. My kids are typically outside playing in the backyard so they are supervised. With all the rain we have been getting though the floor of the coop is just gross…Any suggestions on what I can put down for it to soak up the water and keep it dry?
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. LindaB220

    LindaB220 Overrun With Chickens

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    Actually yours is better for my needs. Deep south La. The open air coop. Delightful. [​IMG]
     
  8. Suzyr

    Suzyr Out Of The Brooder

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    @jtbass2756 I didn't know that! We actually live a couple hours east of Raleigh by the coast. I love my little flock, I wish had a bit of a bigger yard now though.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

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    So. Calif.
    My folks experimented with self-sufficient farming on 25 acres for 15 years after WWII.

    For a family of 4 the cow gave way too much milk and had to be milked twice a day - Mom was forever making cheese that was coming out of our ears and when it was more dairy than could be sold or given away the cow was sold. Same with sheep and goats who were honery critters and ate shirt sleeves off the clothesline. Fences wouldn't keep them in and very secure fencing is cost-prohibitive.

    The horse ate like - well - a horse! Pop sold him and got a WWII surplus Caterpiller to plow with.

    The citrus, avocado, and fruit orchards cost more money to irrigate than any profit of selling crops to Sunkist. Because fruit always ripens in summer we spent long hot days canning bushels of fruit over a hot stove for what condensed to a very small harvest after all was canned or pickled.

    The beehives were good for pollinating crops but I'll never forget the nasty critters flying loose stinging everyone in a 10 acre radius.

    The organic garden brought no money as it was a losing battle against bugs and diseases and critters like farm animals, rabbits, and gophers breaking in to eat it.

    The poultry had to be fenced expensively to keep out wandering neighbor dogs and aerial predators. There were ducks, geese, and chickens. The ducks gave bigger eggs than the chickens so the chickens went to the freezer. The ducks were smelly and made a mess of water so they were the next to go into the freezer. Kept the geese for food and big eggs as their meat was less greasy than duck and the live geese were good mean watchdogs. But as all the experiments wound down so did the geese til there were none left. After 15 years of self-sufficient farming the land lay fallow for another 2 years and ultimately rented out.

    There was no self-sufficiency on our folks' 25 acres as Pop had to have a civilian job to pour money into the farm. The farm was paid for but constantly increasing taxes and farm needs kept costing more every year. There was more pouring into self-sufficiency then coming out of it and Pop worked hard at his day job that there was no energy for chores and Mom carried the brunt of farm work.

    I wouldn't trade my first 15 years of life on a farm and still consider myself farm folk but it's not a practical reality in this economy (or even WWII economy either).

    About the best way to farm nowadays is after working for a nice nest-egg retiriement and retire on a little acreage. And if you're lucky enough as a senior to upkeep the chores.

    I've retired in a small city cottage with a small yard and bring as much gardening and chickens as space allows to bring back a few memories. I would never recommend self-sufficiency full time however. Yes - it's organic and yes, it's healthier, but there is a high price for it. That's why we like to support the local farmers' markets for those people who work so hard to grow the good stuff - but even those folks have to have paying civilian work to support self-sufficiency (ironic term for something that really isn't self-sustaining LOL).
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
    2 people like this.
  10. sammirae09

    sammirae09 Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes lol we only have an acre I'm used to 80 acres back home. My husband wants enough to deer hunt on and where we can have a 4 wheeler, plus I hate the city
     

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