Predator deterrent/dogs in general?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by johnsons-r-us, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. johnsons-r-us

    johnsons-r-us Chillin' With My Peeps

    362
    0
    99
    Jul 18, 2011
    Eudora, Kansas
    For someone with a very small and expanding family hobby farm, would a genuine LGD really be necessary, or would a generally good family “watchdog” type dog keep predators away? Example: we started with chickens last year and will add a couple of goats (for milk, yogurt, soaps etc.) next spring. We have been lucky so far with no real predator problems. However, we do live in the country and we have coyotes, raccoons, opossum and other critters all around. I’ve seen them on the road side in not such great condition. [​IMG] We don’t have enough land to give a GP, and not enough livestock to give a “real” LGD. However, wouldn’t a dog roaming our property naturally keep the critters at bay? I like to adopt shelter/rescue dogs. [​IMG] I think if I could choose the right tempered dog it would work out fine. Anyone else have a similar situation?
     
  2. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    I have a pit bull that seems to do a great job keeping all small predators at bay. I have had chickens since spring and let them free range. They roost on the fence at night. I have not had a single issue with predators. I have seen her kill snakes and foxes.....I am pretty sure she must keep 'coons and possums gone too. I did get sheep this year and added a couple of Anatolian Shepherd pups to protect them when they get older, since coyote population is on the rise around here.
     
  3. Katydid2011

    Katydid2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

    793
    4
    121
    Apr 22, 2011
    West Coast USA
    We have a very small family farm and the only predator problem we've had with the chickens is one of our own dogs. We see coyotes, hawks, racoons, etc. but between our German Shepherd (not a chicken-chaser), mini-donkey, and the electrical wire that we have running round the perimeter of the property, pastures, and coop-runs we haven't had any problems with wild predators. It's our own house-dog that's become a problem and we may have to rehome her. Our GSD is happy to patrol the property along with our fierce and adorable little guardian donkey, but the house dog will take any chance she gets to dart out of the house and head for the pasture to attack the chickens. [​IMG]

    Shelters are usually amazing about matching people and dogs, so if you're wanting a shelter dog go in and tell them exactly what you need and they will help you find a dog with the right temperament. It's still likely going to take a fair bit of time before you can trust the dog with your birds. Our German Shepherd Dog has been guarding our flock for about a year now and we're still very careful with him, constantly reinforcing his training which is, in a nutshell, that we are alpha and the chickens belong to us, he may not even look at them. His presence in their midst is a fabulous deterrent to predators. Unfortunately, even though we've done the same training with our house dog, a Dachshunds, she's simply not willing to listen.
     
  4. Hens & Hounds

    Hens & Hounds Chillin' With My Peeps

    160
    5
    101
    May 11, 2011
    NJ
    We have 2 rescued Coon hounds that were transported up here from the south & I have to say they have been absolutely wonderful w/ the chickens w/o any extensive training on what to do or what not to do. They already have a super high prey drive for their prey which are all poultry predators. The only thing to take into consideration is their baying as they have very loud barks that can disturb neighbors, but if that isn't a problem w/ you I would definitely say to consider adopting one. Although they are not bird dogs & don't bother birds, our Plott hound watches the skyline & trees for hawks in daytime (he don't allow anything larger than a crow in yard) I have numerous bird feeders & bird baths all over property so they know what's normal to see & what is not. They both patrol whole perimeter every night for nighttime predators, they can "do it all night long" [​IMG] All windows & doors can be closed w/ heat or a/c on & they WILL wake you up in middle of night if they sense something! I tell you it is simply amazing their sense of smell through house walls! One 9is a cold nose hound while other is a hot nose hound meaning one can sniff out old scents while other can only smell fresh scents. They hardly shed at all & w/ years of buying Dobermans from breeders I must say that these adopted dogs truly remember where they came from & are most grateful to being adopted & being rescued from being ties to trees never to be inside a house let alone having a warm bed in summer or cool a/c in winter. Please consider adopting as it will be the most rewarding experience you can witness! Thank you & best of luck w/ whatever you decide is best for you! [​IMG]
     
  5. ninabeast

    ninabeast Chillin' With My Peeps

    775
    7
    121
    Apr 10, 2011
    Upstate New York
    I have an adolescent Great Dane, introduced to our household (and our ten hens) two months ago. She's doing GREAT. She does like to scatter the chickens for fun, but seems to have no prey issues YET. She understands "OFF the chickens!!!" and can be trusted around them off leash, very closely supervised.

    We lost a hen to a fox the day after Hurricane Irene, and discovered that there is a fox hole in one of our woods, a winter den. I have been saving up Great Dane poo (and there is a LOT) and shoving it down the fox hole, so Mama will choose somewhere else this winter to have her kits. The rest gets distributed around the perimeter of the wood. I'm hoping that will go a long way to convince the predators to choose another farm.

    So far...so good.
     
  6. r4eboxer

    r4eboxer Crooked Creek Poultry

    909
    11
    133
    Sep 20, 2011
    Fairmont
    I am your situation almost exactly. I have a 30 acre homestead, I wouldn't call it a farm yet, and I am planning on adding 4 legged stock next spring as well. I have chickens and in a week will have ducks.

    I have been researching Great Pyrenees and for some reason they seem to be pretty controversal on this site. This spring I did stop in at our local rescue shelter. Unfortuanatly I didn't find a dog that meshed with all the criteria I was looking for.

    I think any type dog will benefit you in predator patrol. I'm not sure of all the things you hope to prevent or want from a dog. With me it comes down to not wanting to have a seperate dog for every thing I need one for. I am still debating on what breed myself.

    Good luck to you in your search for the perfect pooch.
     
  7. johnsons-r-us

    johnsons-r-us Chillin' With My Peeps

    362
    0
    99
    Jul 18, 2011
    Eudora, Kansas
    Quote:I love the look of Anatolians! I love pit bulls too. [​IMG] Guess it's hard to find a breed I don't like. It seems you have a great dog. I bet she does keep things away. They can be very tenacious.
     
  8. johnsons-r-us

    johnsons-r-us Chillin' With My Peeps

    362
    0
    99
    Jul 18, 2011
    Eudora, Kansas
    Quote:My daughter worked for a shelter for some time, matching prospective owners with new dogs. She's the one who suggested I didn't necessarily need a LGD. I love puppies but will never have them again...too much work! Our rescues have been so easy and are so greatful to be loved. My daughter brings her dachshund over a lot. She is 6 months old. She does chase the chickens, but they are soooo much bigger than she is and they can run faster! [​IMG] She's a mini long-haired. Of course my oegb will put her in her place if anything really gets serious. She's a sweet dog and I can't see her being a problem in the future....but will keep my eye on her.
     
  9. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    Quote:I love the look of Anatolians! I love pit bulls too. [​IMG] Guess it's hard to find a breed I don't like. It seems you have a great dog. I bet she does keep things away. They can be very tenacious.

    That Pit bull is without a doubt the best dog we have ever had. She is the perfect farm/family dog. Even when we got stock (chickens and sheep), she only had to be told once that she was not allowed to play or chase. She learns tricks in just minutes. And she is very nice to my little chihuahuas, letting them eat out of her food bowl. Her only negative is she does not play well with other dogs. I guess she can't help her breeding.
     
  10. johnsons-r-us

    johnsons-r-us Chillin' With My Peeps

    362
    0
    99
    Jul 18, 2011
    Eudora, Kansas
    Hens & Hounds :

    We have 2 rescued Coon hounds that were transported up here from the south & I have to say they have been absolutely wonderful w/ the chickens w/o any extensive training on what to do or what not to do. They already have a super high prey drive for their prey which are all poultry predators. The only thing to take into consideration is their baying as they have very loud barks that can disturb neighbors, but if that isn't a problem w/ you I would definitely say to consider adopting one. Although they are not bird dogs & don't bother birds, our Plott hound watches the skyline & trees for hawks in daytime (he don't allow anything larger than a crow in yard) I have numerous bird feeders & bird baths all over property so they know what's normal to see & what is not. They both patrol whole perimeter every night for nighttime predators, they can "do it all night long" [​IMG] All windows & doors can be closed w/ heat or a/c on & they WILL wake you up in middle of night if they sense something! I tell you it is simply amazing their sense of smell through house walls! One 9is a cold nose hound while other is a hot nose hound meaning one can sniff out old scents while other can only smell fresh scents. They hardly shed at all & w/ years of buying Dobermans from breeders I must say that these adopted dogs truly remember where they came from & are most grateful to being adopted & being rescued from being ties to trees never to be inside a house let alone having a warm bed in summer or cool a/c in winter. Please consider adopting as it will be the most rewarding experience you can witness! Thank you & best of luck w/ whatever you decide is best for you! [​IMG]

    Thank you. I will check out this coonhound link! I had never though of a hound as I thought they would be more likely to chase the chickens with a prey drive instinct. Sounds like yours are great! And I had never heard the terms cold nose/hot nose. Interesting! I agree, having taken in the 3 rescues we currently have. They are so greatful to be in a good home! They were so easy to integrate, even though two were from caged puppy mill raids. Now they are couch/bed dogs [​IMG] and can live out their retirement not worrying about the conditions they were taken from. And all 3 of my adult rescues never bother the chickens. They will attempt to "share" food, so far the chickens don't mind either.​
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by