QUESTION ASKED me was SCRATCH with WHEAT ADDED is that ENOUGH for HEALTHY CHICKENS?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Glenda Heywoodo, Feb 9, 2017.

  1. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glenda Heywood
    I am not saying that I did this just answering the question.
    I fed Purina mash and whole oats with grit and oyster shell.


    QUESTION ANSWERED:
    When asked if feeding scratch grain with adding wheat enough for laying hens?
    I answered:
    wheat is much more healthier than scratch.
    as scratch is mostly corn and is adding fat to the gut of the chicken with less protein.
    here is some things wheat has over scratch.

    Nutrition Facts and Information about Wheat:
    It contains Manganese, Phosphorus, Magnesium and Selenium in very large quantities. Rich in Zinc, Copper, Iron and Potassium. However, Calcium is also present in small amounts.

    Vitamin Content of Wheat:
    It is rich in Vitamin B6, Niacin, Thiamin, Folate, Riboflavin and Pantothenic Acid. Vitamin E and Vitamin K are also present in small but considerable amounts.

    Calorie Content of Wheat:
    Wheat has a calorific value of 339.0 per 100 gm. Being a grain, it is very appropriate in calories and hence, filling as a food.

    This site has some very important facts on feeding chickens for layers.

    extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/html/pnw/pnw477/ - 15k - Cached

    It is also noted whether feeding scratch or wheat just what they consume in 20 minutes
    and scratch is for the actual exercise the chickens uses in scratching for the grain and ofcourse needing granite grit also with scratch or wheat.

    Wheat is about 12% protein so it is healthier for chickens as scratch is mostly corn and 9-10% protein value.

    and the fact that higher protein value is needed in summer
    PDF] Feeding the Backyard Laying Flock File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat
    Higher protein levels are of value during hot weather ... should be 20 percent protein. If a greater portion of scratch grains is desirable, ...
    www.wvu.edu/~exten/infores/pubs/livepoul/pfs
    Glenda L Heywood Cassville Missouri
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  2. ShanandGem

    ShanandGem Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 16, 2016
    A chicken couldn't survive on scratch grains and wheat.
     
  3. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the comment.
    I agree whole heartedly.
    I always had a feeder for Whole horse oats as my chickens. liked it as a supplement to the laying mash I fed them.
    I never fed scratch as I did not like the birds fat on corn!!


    My chickens layed good and never really acted like they needed much more than good laying mash and whole oats and grit and oyster shell.
    Glenda Heywood
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  4. ShanandGem

    ShanandGem Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 16, 2016
    I see in your signature line that you have been an editor for nearly 30 years. I have to say, I have read several of your posts in multiple areas of the forums and I find them incredibly difficult to understand. Lack of punctuation, run on sentences, and a general lack of cohesion are rampant in your posts.. I say this not to be hurtful but because I think you could get a lot more traffic to threads you start if you could be clearer about what you wanted to discuss. I can't be the only one having this issue.
    I honestly thought you were counseling people to feed only scratch and wheat in this thread.
     
    2 people like this.
  5. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for telling me this.
    and no I am not rambling.
    AND I AM NOT COUNSELING ANY ONE BUT TRYIN TO INFORM THEM IN THE INFORMTION BEING DISCUSSED.
    I just try and issue the facts about the subject.
    I corrected this post as you suggested.
    sorry it was confusing for you.
    I will try and put periods in if that helps you all.
    Thanks
    Glenda Heywood
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  6. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well this is March 5th and I went an put periods in most of my posts as I found them.

    Alo am trying to make more sense in my writing.

    I have had people reading my articles wthout any complaint for many years.

    BUT AM ALWAYS OPEN TO NEW IDEAS, THANKS
     
  7. wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for using punctuation.
    I must admit that I had been skipping many of your posts because of the lack of punctuation made them difficult to understand. Not just yours, I tend to skip any posts that do not have punctuation. I have too little time to do reading on this forum to waste time trying to figure out a run on post.

    Thank you for the information on Wheat nutrition.

    I was given a #10 can of wheat to feed to my chickens by a friend who volunteers at a food pantry. Someone donated some un-opened cans of whole wheat and the date on the bottom of the can has passed so they cannot distribute it. I may be getting a more cans "for the chickens". In all honesty, I have been grinding if for making bread for hubs and me - but the chickens are getting some too. I have been sprouting it for them as a special treat - they go nuts for sprouted wheat and it is easy enough to do.
    I have purchased canned whole wheat and am familiar with the product. The stuff I bought was dated as best by 5 years after it was packaged, but it is actually good for about 20 to 30 years. So no fears about feeding "expired" food to the chickens.
     

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