Raccoon in the hen house! Wounded hen...HELP!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by hennypennysmom, May 29, 2011.

  1. 1livelychick

    1livelychick Songster

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    Quote:The raccoon went up a tree and stayed there while we gathered the girls and put them in their (now) very secure coop. Could she get rabies? I didn't think chickens could. Could I get rabies from handling her? Geez, I've already been picking her up and putting her down.

    She's very, very out of it. Not sure she can see - although that might be the shock. She did eat a bit of yogurt off my finger though, but isn't moving much (she's standing up).

    This is something that would be prudent for you to follow up on...just to make sure and be cautious. Did you come in contact with the saliva from the coon? Maybe call a hospital e.r today or your dr./health dept tomorrow. I don't know if chickens can become rabid. I was bitten by a chipmunk a couple of years ago..went to the E.R...fortunately the er dr looked up chipmunks and they don't get rabies...I still have to have a tetanus shot, and a round of antibiotics. If I were you and you see the coon dispatch it and call the local authorities...don't shoot it in the head though...They won't be able to test it. Good luck and keep us posted.
     
  2. Attila the Hen

    Attila the Hen Songster

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    I thought rabies was a concern when an animal was behaving erratically. A raccoon attacking chickens if normal behaviour. Of course one always wants to be careful, but I think it's a bit of a reach to assume there may be a rabies problem unless there has been a recent outbreak.
    I wouldn't worry about rabies -- only about protecting your flock with the appropriate means. You can kill the raccoon but there are more where he came from and you can't kill them all.
     
  3. 1livelychick

    1livelychick Songster

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    Quote:Yes. You are right, Attila the hen...( I just lost my seven year old barred rock named Attila the Hen!) However, it's more of a precautionary. Noone is assuming anything. Only health professionals can make the proper determination. I would aire on the side of caution both with the coop, predator proof reinforcement, my chickens health and safety and my own personal safety....maybe it's overkill..Personally I would rather cover all those areas of concern than regret it later.....that's just me, though:idunno
     
  4. hennypennysmom

    hennypennysmom In the Brooder

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    Well - I called the CDC hotline to ask about the possible exposure to rabies. She said that only mammals get rabies, chickens are not mammals - she said not to worry about it since no one came in direct contact with the raccoon. She said there was no chance that there would be transmission. Good to know!

    Aster is still alive, but doesn't seem to be improving at all. She still appears to be in shock. We have covered her wounds with Blue-Kote, as instructed by the chicken guy at Agway. Not looking good at this point. Not sure how long I can let her go like this, or for that matter, what I can do about it.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. jjthink

    jjthink Crowing

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    What has been done for her at this point to help with shock etc?

    Keep reassuring her and if she has a good buddy, bring that buddy to her.

    Sending good wishes.

    JJ
     
  6. hennypennysmom

    hennypennysmom In the Brooder

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    Quote:She doesn't really have a buddy. She is sort of an aggressive girl (top of the pecking order). We've offered water to her (on a little spoon), yogurt and applesauce. She's away from the flock, warm and safe in a tall cardboard box with a layer of pine shavings. I cleaned the wound, painted Blue Kote on it. I've spent time out there, talking softly to her. It doesn't appear that she's hearing and/or seeing me - although, it could be the shock. How long does this sort of shock last?

    Kara
     
  7. 1livelychick

    1livelychick Songster

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    Quote:So glad on the good news with your safety! It's always good to know!
    I mix a blend of whatever yummies they will eat....cut up strawberries, cook oatmeal, bananas, yogurt, cooked egg electrolytes.
    So sorry you're going through this...Hope she pulls through. Is she on antibiotics for her wounds?
     
  8. leadwolf1

    leadwolf1 Songster

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    Raccoons do not have to 'show' symptoms to be rabid. I would err on the side of caution and speak to a health care provider. However, since people dr's don't deal with rabies often, it might be a wiser option to speak to a vet on the subject.

    And, the advise to dispatch of the raccoon and have it tested is not a bad idea. Much better to be safe then sorry where rabies is a concern.

    Just read your last post, great idea to call the CDC!!!! Hope all goes well.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2011
  9. Heathero617

    Heathero617 Songster

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    Quote:The raccoon went up a tree and stayed there while we gathered the girls and put them in their (now) very secure coop. Could she get rabies? I didn't think chickens could. Could I get rabies from handling her? Geez, I've already been picking her up and putting her down.

    She's very, very out of it. Not sure she can see - although that might be the shock. She did eat a bit of yogurt off my finger though, but isn't moving much (she's standing up).

    This is something that would be prudent for you to follow up on...just to make sure and be cautious. Did you come in contact with the saliva from the coon? Maybe call a hospital e.r today or your dr./health dept tomorrow. I don't know if chickens can become rabid. I was bitten by a chipmunk a couple of years ago..went to the E.R...fortunately the er dr looked up chipmunks and they don't get rabies...I still have to have a tetanus shot, and a round of antibiotics. If I were you and you see the coon dispatch it and call the local authorities...don't shoot it in the head though...They won't be able to test it. Good luck and keep us posted.

    In order to contract rabies from an animal is to be bitten by an infected animal. Coming in contact will not spread the disease as it needs to enter the body. Unless of course you come in contact with the saliva or blood of a rabbid animal and that fluid gets into your eyes, mouth, or open wound. You can NOT get it from it touching your skin only. Although its very rare, chipmonks CAN contract the disease, chickens and other birds do not contract the disease as it effects mammals. If the raccoon was rabbid it would be acting out of the "norm" for a raccoon which would be a dazed or confused look, staggering and/or falling over, have no fear of humans and move extreamly slowly. They dont normally attack when infected as the disease puts them in a "stooper" or depression. So if the raccoon was acting as a normal racoon would act, and apparently going after a flock is "normal" when given the opportunity, i'd say the raccoon was not infected and the worst threat is that to the flock again.
     
  10. jjthink

    jjthink Crowing

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    Shock shouldn't go on too long but it varies bird to bird (I once rescued an injured bird who did not rally till day 7 - he made a full recovery). The remedies noted are very important (electrolytes). Rescue Remedy as noted may help her. Running to work but will check back.

    JJ
     

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