Really need suggestions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by adorable, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    I have some babies that i put on the heat lamp for .They are in the same coop as my adults are in. At night when everything is closed up and heat lamp is on for about an hour. I notice that my walls started to sweat and then starts to run down the walls. I was concerned that if i kepted the heat lamp on. It would get way to much moisture in there and cause ammonia for the birds. So i turned it off. As goes for the babies they range from 2 weeks and up. So they did have some feathers. I went in there this morning. The wall were dry up .Turned the heat lamp back on. And open the small pop door to let the adults out. Now what can i do to stop this from happening when things are closed up. ????[​IMG]
     
  2. JestersEye

    JestersEye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 12, 2008
    Mullica Twp., NJ
    You could set up a small dehumidifier to remove the excess moisture. That's all I can think of that would work. It would have to be big enough to hold the liquid it sucked out over night, and you'd have to empty it each morning... unless you also got a sump pump to put in the tray and ran a hose outside somehow. That way, you'd never have to empty the water. That's how we handled moisture in our basement, anyway.
     
  3. emys

    emys Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    Idaho
    You need a small vent up high. I know it seems your heat will escape, but you need the moisture to escape more.
     
  4. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    I cant put in a vent at this time of year. As goes for a dehumidifier ,it is to big for the coop. What about a fan blown around would that help at all?
     
  5. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Even if you take a drill and bore several large holes (maybe 1"bit?) under the roof line of your coop that would help. Is your roof metal? I read on another post that uninsulated metal or plastic will sweat. If it is, then you could put foam insulation on the ceiling. But that ventilation is critical. And babies that little (without mama sitting them) need to be kept warm. Could you bring the babies in until they're at least 5 weeks or so???
     
  6. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Could you drill a few small holes in the door, high up, and put in those 1" vent plugs?
    Those chicks are very young, still need heat, it's tough raising chicks this time of year.
    A fan blows the moisture around, it needs to exit.
    Is your lamp close to the waterer? If so could it me moved?
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2009
  7. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    Quote:The coop is insulated. Yes it is a tin roof and sides. The chicks are up high and the heat lamp is high also.....The water is on the floor. I guess it is to air tight. I didnt want any peditors getting in. I guess i have no choice but put in a vent. What really cause moisture when it is insulated.?[​IMG] I dont understand that.
     
  8. emys

    emys Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    Idaho
    The chickens themselves breathing out moist air.


    My husband just added some winter vents this summer using 2inch hole saw, 2inch PVC pipe cut to length and inserting round 2inch vent covers over each end. Very easy to do.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2009
  9. gsim

    gsim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 18, 2009
    East Tennessee
    You need to separate the chicks. Bring them into the garage or laundry room until they are feathered out. Otherwise you risk even your adult birds. A vent is not optional for any coop. It is mandatory, and should be located on at least two walls. Closeable / adjustable is best by far. You should vent it for the adults that are in there but do not try to make one coop work for both sets of birds at this time of year. You risk temp shock when adults go out if coop too warm. [​IMG]
     
  10. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Quote:The coop is insulated. Yes it is a tin roof and sides. The chicks are up high and the heat lamp is high also.....The water is on the floor. I guess it is to air tight. I didnt want any peditors getting in. I guess i have no choice but put in a vent. What really cause moisture when it is insulated.?[​IMG] I dont understand that.

    Well insulated and tight and snug is good in many senses. But then you put a lot of moisture into the air (through the chickens breathing and in their poop) and all that moisture has no where to go. It rises in the warm air and collects somewhere (ceiling or wall sweating) if it can't all escape, which is why ample ventilation up high is so important, so all of that warm(er) moist air can rise up and out of the coop. Less protected coops, although at risk for drafts, have tons of escape points for warm moist air.

    My coop is well insulated and very tight. I am able to get away with smaller vent openings in the winter because I only have five chickens, and I remove droppings daily. That's another consideration for you...dropping boards under roosts. Takes literally a minute for me to scrape the poop into a bucket and another minute to pick up any loose dropping in the bedding. Even with a bunch of chickens, it may take 5 minutes. Good luck! I sure hope you get this under control so your birds stay healthy through the winter!!
     

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