releasing quail?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by pheasant24, Dec 28, 2010.

  1. pheasant24

    pheasant24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 31, 2010
    Kalamazoo, MI
    what are the best knid of quail to release? (bobwhite variations?)
    I'm in Michigan. so do some do better in cold or warm?
     
  2. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Wisconsin Jumbo or Northerns.
    Most Jumbos are bred for longer wing span and faster flies.
     
  3. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 2, 2009
    BROOKSVILLE FL
    Quote:#1 CHECK YOUR LOCAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS! http://www.fws.gov/offices/statelinks.html

    RAISING
    QUAIL FOR RELEASE IS HIGHLY CONTROLLED IN MOST STATES AND MUST BE DONE IN A VERY SPECIFIC WAY.... EVEN WHEN DONE CORRECTLY THE SURVIVAL TO BREEDING RATES ARE DEPLORABLE AT BEST IN MOST OF THESE CASES. IN MANY STATES IT IS ILLEGAL COMPLETELY, THE LINK ABOVE HAS ALL STATE DNR/ FISH AND GAME WEBSITES POSTED IN IT--- CLICK ON IT AND FOLLOW TO YOUR STATE REGULATORY AGENCY. AS FAR AS STRAIN OF BOB BEST SUITED FOR THIS WOULD BE THE STANDARD BOB... JUMBOS ARE BRED FOR SIZE, NOT FLIGHT ABILITY AND SINCE THEY TEND TO BE LIL FAT BOYZ THEY DONT FLY SO WELL [​IMG]

    SO FAR AS I KNOW THERE ARE NO HOT/ COLD TOLERANCE DIFFFERENCES IN ANY STRAIN OF BOB WHITE... THEY ALL WOULD DO AS WELL AS ANY OTHER STRAIN. CLIMATE IS RARELY A FACTOR FOR INDIGENOUS SPECES SURVIVAL... MOTHER NATURE HAS ALREADY SEEN TO THAT ASPECT. THE BIGGEST PROBLEMS LIE WITH LACK OF SUITABLE HABITAT AND PREDATION
     
  4. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Yes please do what JJ said!! [​IMG]
     
  5. pheasant24

    pheasant24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 31, 2010
    Kalamazoo, MI
    ok thanks! [​IMG]
     
  6. joe125

    joe125 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 20, 2010
    Defiantly obey all federal, state, and local laws when releasing any captive raised animal back into the wild. There are procedures (Time/Money) involved, that go far and above, what most folks like to spend. There is a reason we don't see bobs milling about on our property the way they used to, and it has nothing to do with people (NOT) releasing birds, and everything to do with habitat. (As Jj points out). Without the proper habitat no species can survive to raise a 2nd generation. Even if they make it 2 years in the wild, I am unaware of any scientific evidence that says they will produce a second generation, much less create a sustainable breeding population. They are just flitting about waiting to be picked off by a hawk, fox, coon, or a lucky person with a shotgun.
     
  7. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 12, 2010
    chesapeake Va.
    Quote:This is the main reason that most do not make it unless predator control is part of the release plan most will not make it you are just feeding predators LOL
     
  8. J3172

    J3172 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 6, 2010
    Michigan
    Here in michigan we can release up to 12 birds without a Game Bird Release Permit. I would never release quail in the snow/winter, as they will surly starve. The best time would be in the summer, I wait until the birds are at least 12 weeks before I release. If your going to raise bobwhite here in michigan for releasing purposes I would get Wisconsin Jumbos, as a bigger bird can hold more fat. The way you raise them is different too. I wouldn't raise them on wire if all your going to do is release them. Build as big of a pen as you can with as few birds as possible in it. Plant local plants so they get a feeling for what food to eat, and how to hide when hawks fly over, etc. Many times released birds do not survive. What I do is get a covey of birds, around 8 or so raise them together away from other coveys in a well planted large pen. That has given me the best results. Good Luck
     

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