Roof for Chicken Run

hhouck514

Chirping
Nov 4, 2018
41
67
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OR
What would you recommend that I use for the roof of a chicken run? Would a UV treated netting work well? I have some chicks coming from Cackle Hatchery later this week, and I will be building a coop/run for them soon. I need to use something that can keep flying bantams in, but also keep birds of prey out. Thanks in Advance!
 
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imnukensc

Crowing
May 22, 2017
1,425
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SC Midlands
It keeps other animals out like I said in my previous post. There are more worrisome animals than hawks.
I agree, but that's not what the OP asked about. And even so, I wouldn't recommend HWC. Welded wire comes in smaller meshes, too, like 1/2 X 1, 1 X 1, 1 X 2, is easier to work with than HWC and is heavier gauge (thicker) than HWC. Lots of folks seem to think HWC is the holy grail. I'm not one of them.
 

A_Fowl_Guy

Pig Whisperer
Premium member
5 Years
May 4, 2014
3,898
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Newberry, Indiana
I agree, but that's not what the OP asked about. And even so, I wouldn't recommend HWC. Welded wire comes in smaller meshes, too, like 1/2 X 1, 1 X 1, 1 X 2, is easier to work with than HWC and is heavier gauge (thicker) than HWC. Lots of folks seem to think HWC is the holy grail. I'm not one of them.
Those gaps are still far too large. A raccoon can grab through and still kill a chicken with welded wire.
 

paneubert

Songster
Nov 20, 2015
1,963
2,662
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Snohomish County, Washington State
My Coop
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Those gaps are still far too large. A raccoon can grab through and still kill a chicken with welded wire.
A raccoon will not be grabbing a chicken thru the roof of the run. There is no reason why a chicken would be within grabbing distance of the roof of a run, especially during the prime raccoon/ground based predator hours. We are talking about a roof, not a wall at ground level. Since they say their goal is to keep birds in and hawks out, the wider spaced and thicker/heavier wire is the way to go for at least 4 reasons I can see. First, thicker wire will last longer. Second, price will be the same, if not slightly cheaper. Third, easier to work with. Fourth, leaves and other stuff falls thru a lot easier, so makes maintenance easier. Also snow....they live in Oregon, so most likely get a little snow. Or a lot. Depends on which side of the mountains. A roof of hardware cloth will hold snow like a sold roof would. But will be weaker.

I echo what @imnukensc said in their post in regards to hardware cloth being fabulous in general, but not the needed/prefered choice for a ROOF to a run.... "I agree, but that's not what the OP asked about."
 

A_Fowl_Guy

Pig Whisperer
Premium member
5 Years
May 4, 2014
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Newberry, Indiana
A raccoon will not be grabbing a chicken thru the roof of the run. There is no reason why a chicken would be within grabbing distance of the roof of a run, especially during the prime raccoon/ground based predator hours. We are talking about a roof, not a wall at ground level. Since they say their goal is to keep birds in and hawks out, the wider spaced and thicker/heavier wire is the way to go for at least 4 reasons I can see. First, thicker wire will last longer. Second, price will be the same, if not slightly cheaper. Third, easier to work with. Fourth, leaves and other stuff falls thru a lot easier, so makes maintenance easier. Also snow....they live in Oregon, so most likely get a little snow. Or a lot. Depends on which side of the mountains. A roof of hardware cloth will hold snow like a sold roof would. But will be weaker.

I echo what @imnukensc said in their post in regards to hardware cloth being fabulous in general, but not the needed/prefered choice for a ROOF to a run.... "I agree, but that's not what the OP asked about."
I should clarify my post: that was in regards to the overall benefit of hwc over welded wire. To use for a roof, our local prices are far cheaper to use hwc over welded wire.
 
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