1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Rooster Attack

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by jjdent, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. jjdent

    jjdent Out Of The Brooder

    57
    0
    39
    Oct 20, 2013
    Rustburg, VA
    It's my first time with chickens. I've got a mating pair of Black Australorps. For the first month I had them, they were perfectly docile, would follow me around and let me guide them with a staff to where I want them to go. Then one morning, I was out there pulling up a tarp off a couple rows I was covering for the first frost, and the rooster started attacking me, time and again, and would not stop. I kicked him away 7 or 8 times and he just kept coming back for more. Now, every morning, he flies up onto the porch, where typically I would gently guide him back down into the yard before he craps all over the porch. But now, he attacks me every morning, whether or not I have the staff in my hand (which he has usually respected). Help! I think the hen is just about laying age, at least that's what her previous owner said, and she's been showing a couple of the signs (really red comb and waddles, and the squatting behavior). The rooster doesn't seem to know what to do yet, though, as I have not yet seen them mating. I wonder if their coming of age has anything to do with his increase in aggressiveness? Help!
     
  2. narutat

    narutat New Egg

    1
    0
    6
    Aug 3, 2013
    Do you have picture ?
    I may help you if watch it.
     
  3. jjdent

    jjdent Out Of The Brooder

    57
    0
    39
    Oct 20, 2013
    Rustburg, VA
    I can do a picture, but not a video.
     
  4. jjdent

    jjdent Out Of The Brooder

    57
    0
    39
    Oct 20, 2013
    Rustburg, VA
    It seems to be usually when he thinks one of us is coming between him and the hen.
     
  5. jjdent

    jjdent Out Of The Brooder

    57
    0
    39
    Oct 20, 2013
    Rustburg, VA
    [​IMG]
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

    32,674
    5,421
    556
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Only those two chickens...if just coming to maturity, rooster is feeling his oats....he also probably needs more hens.
     
  7. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

    34,028
    449
    448
    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    He is doing his job. He sees you as a competitor or threat and is protecting his hen. That said, the world is full of roosters who are not people aggressive, who generally simply avoid people, or ma even be friendly, and this is commonly felt to be an inherited trait, so most people here will not breed a people aggressive rooster.

    If you choose to keep and breed him, there are lots of threads and some articles here on rooster management. The simplest technique is to look directly at him and walk toward him til he backs down, pushing him away from you if necessary. if you can catch him, you can also walk aorund for several minutes with him tucked under our arm like a football. The idea is to show him you are the dominant roster in the flock, not him, so he will avoid you.
     
  8. goodb

    goodb Chillin' With My Peeps

    I had a similar issue with my BA rooster. I tried avoiding him and he avoided me until Monday he ran across the pen and jumped at me as if he was spurring me. That was preceded with charges and his crouching was all I could take. He is now sitting in my refrigerator "cooling off."
     
  9. jjdent

    jjdent Out Of The Brooder

    57
    0
    39
    Oct 20, 2013
    Rustburg, VA
    Haha, well, thanks, all. Let's just say it's bringing to life the metaphors of farmers and story-books about the farmer finally having his ultimate revenge when the rooster ends up on the dining room table. We have little boys very active around the yard, too, who probably make the chickens nervous. I think he was probably threatened by my waving around that tarp a bit, and I won't do that again with him in there. I have a front lot and a back lot and can move them around as I need to not have them in an area in which I'm working. I've also re-arranged my fence-line so that it does not border the porch anymore, as they seem to have taken a liking to that area, and I'd rather they not. He's kinda hard to get ahold of. His previous owner was real soft on him, so I'll have to see about the hands-on approach. He does avoid me, for the most part, but in the mornings particularly will now come at me regularly. I'll see if keeping him from having access to the porch will prevent that. Thanks a bunch.

    P.S. The funny thing is, he'll attack big-ole me, but fly away from the medium-sized dog we have. And I don't exactly take it easy on him when he attacks. It's either my foot or a large staff. He just gets it into him.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2013
  10. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

    31,452
    3,522
    538
    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon
    Invite him to dinner. Seriously. why keep an animal that attacks you? And you have kids, right? Don't put them at risk, or risk giving them a lifelong fear of chickens from getting attacked.

    Yes, he's doing this because he's coming of age and the testosterone is kicking in. Still no excuse. As previously stated, there are lots of roosters that show no aggression to humans. Get one of them.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by