Rooster can’t balance or walk, sudden onest

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by CoolClucker, Nov 9, 2019.

  1. CoolClucker

    CoolClucker Songster

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Indiana USA
    My 6 year old rooster has all of a sudden started having balance and walking issues. Two days ago I cleaned their coop and trimmed his spurs. His left leg has bothered him for about a year now. No sign of injury, just thought maybe arthritis. He’s always got around fine just with a odd gait. He doesn’t like to be held so he struggled a bit being picked up, but nothing major. I scooped him up and trimmed his spurs without incident. Yesterday when I went to check on him, he was sitting down, and not crowing. He tried to get up to eat some treats and staggered then fell forward like a drunk person. He plopped back down. He can get up and waddle with great effort into the coop but he shakes a bit as if it’s a strain. All other chickens are fine. He seems alert but I can’t tell if he’s just dizzy and weak or in pain. I tried hand feeding him and he wanted no part of it, he’s not super tame. It just stressed him out. I’ve noticed his wing on his same side seems a bit limp also. Tonight I bought livestock muscle lineament and rubbed on his leg under the feathers, no wound or trauma visible. He really kicked at me, but again he’s not super tame, or maybe he’s in pain..? Only a few scales on his hock are red, but it could be from him stumbling, sitting and falling. I also sprayed blu kote antifungal on both legs to cover leg mites. I gave him some nutridrench as well, and even put probiotics and electrolytes in their water. I don’t know what else to do or what’s wrong. Did he have a stroke, is it mareks, broken leg, leg mites....?? I’m at a total loss. He’s having a very difficult time getting around, he just sits in the run all day, then the coop at night because he can’t roost. No messy butt from diarrhea. I just changed over to medium pine shavings for the winter for them. They’ve had them in the past with no issues. Good ventilation. In summer I use sand. They are modified free roam in their enclosed run, which is about 30 by 20 ft. If anyone can help, I’d be so grateful.
     
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  2. My Chicken Friends

    My Chicken Friends Chirping

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    Nov 8, 2019
    Sorry I can’t help. I just wanted to say I’m sorry this is happening. I had a chicken go through this for several weeks. Then it just disappeared. She has been normal since. I have no clue what was wrong and I felt helpless. I hope you little guy is ok. I pray it goes away as easy as it came.
     
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  3. CoolClucker

    CoolClucker Songster

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Indiana USA
    Ty for the reply. It’s so sad and frustrating to not be able to fix him.
     
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  4. CoolClucker

    CoolClucker Songster

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Indiana USA
    How did your chicken eat and drink?
     
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  5. My Chicken Friends

    My Chicken Friends Chirping

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    We assumed our hen was afflicted with a neurological defect. She was tilting, losing her balance, walking backwards in circles, and falling over. I hand fed her. I Gave probiotics in her water with a dropper, and held her to comfort her. She is a miracle bird. It just disappeared.
     
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  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    So sorry to hear about your rooster. At such an age, he could be coming to the end of his life. Many times it is hard to know what the problem is until after death when a necropsy can be performed by the state vet. Do you have any vet care locally?

    Have you added any new birds to your flock in recent months? Mareks disease is usually something seen in the first year of life, but if exposed to a carrier, any bird can show symptoms 3 or mire weeks afterward.

    Have you looked him over for lice and mites under his vent and elsewhere on skin? How does his crop in his upper right chest feel—empty and flat, or full, hard, doughy, or puffy?

    What kind of food has he been on? If you have any pictures of him or his poops, those might be helpful. I would try to keep him comfortable either with his flock or whatever makes him happier. Place his food and water near enought tho reach. Try giving him 2-3 ml of Poultry NutriDrench daily for a few days. Wet chicken feed, scrambled egg, tuna, ground meat, and sunflower seeds would be good things to offer him if he will eat.
     
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  7. CoolClucker

    CoolClucker Songster

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Indiana USA
    He seems to have no appetite. He’s in his coop, right by the food. He can get it if he just pecks. Tried hand feeding and he pulls away. Even tried treats and nothing. I gave him nutridrench again today and poured some water in tiny amounts in his mouth. No lice or mites. He’s now sitting with both legs out in front, like a human would. I made him as comfortable as possible, petted and sang softly to him. They always like that. He’s been on layer crumbles, he’s the only roo so he eats what the girls do. Crop felt empty and flat. I don’t think he’s pooped in a day or so. He can get up with great effort and then stumbles horribly. No cuts, scrapes, visible injury to his legs or wing, and I don’t feel anything weird. I’m perplexed and so sad I can’t do more. There might be a vet that would see a chicken...maybe. But he would be a wreck because he barely even tolerates me holding him for things like nail trims, etc.
     
  8. CoolClucker

    CoolClucker Songster

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Indiana USA
    You saved her, great job!
     
  9. CoolClucker

    CoolClucker Songster

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Indiana USA
    Also he seems alert but run down. He’s not crowing, his eyes, mouth, nose are clear, no wheezing, coughing, sneezing, no messy butt.
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Layer feed has 4 times the calcium that roosters need. Too much calcium can affect the kidneys causing kidney disease and gout. There are 2 types of gout, one that causes deformity and calcium deposits in the feet and legs, and the other causes calcium deposits elswhere in the body in organs, and kidney disease.

    I have fed layer feed at times to my roosters without a problem, but have also switched to a flock raiser feed at times. My 6 year old rooster suffered with sore legs the last year of his life.

    So it would be hard to know if the higher calcium feed has caused a problem, but I would probably switch to a flock raiser feed and put crushed oyster shell out for the hens in a separate container for them to eat when needed.

    If you feel that your rooster is suffering, you might want to consider putting him down. Then a necropsy could be performed so that you would know what was wrong. Most state poultry vets will perform a necropsy. Here is a list of state vets:
    https://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm
     
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