Roosters

donrae

Hopelessly Addicted
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Jun 18, 2010
31,453
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Southern Oregon
If you don't want barring why are you using a barred rooser
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From this mix all the offspring will be barred, but each of them will have a fifty percent chance of having non-barred offspring. So yeah, in a couple of generations you'd be consistently backd to black birds. But it will take a lot of culling of the barred birds, are you set up for that?
 

Annie G

In the Brooder
7 Years
Nov 15, 2012
17
0
22
Linden, TN
Yes, I am. I was given these two beautiful roosters; one is a barred rock and one is a Wyandotte. I have Giant Black Jersey and Americauna hens. I will eventually have a coop for each breed I want to raise. I love doing this and we also raise chickens for meat so we will put in the freezer what we don't plan to breed.
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,862
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Southeast Louisiana
Remember that the barred gene is sex linked. A rooster gets a copy from both his parents but the hen only gets a copy from her father.

So the first generation of a barred rooster over a non-barred hen, the boys will be split for the barring but all the girls will be barred. So you have to keep one of these roosters to get rid of the barring. But you have two choices on the hens.

You can put that rooster over the Jersey Giant hen. Half the offspring, male and female, will be barred and half will not. These are just odds of course not real results. I've had 4 out of 4 barred from this type of cross. What you actually get is just luck!

If you breed that rooster back to his sisters, all the boys will have barring. They'll get that from their mother. You really won't know if the boys have two barred genes or not. You can make a pretty good guess because the boys with double barring will be lighter in color than the ones split for the barring, but that is just an educated guess. You may hatch nothing but double barred roosters.

So if you keep the non-barred hens from this generation and mate them back to their father who you know is split for the barred gene, half their offspring, male and female, will be barred and half will not. This is the generation where you can eliminate all the barring.
 
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aoxa

Crowing
8 Years
Aug 8, 2011
19,042
1,226
421
Shediac Cape NB, Canada
My Coop
My Coop
Remember that the barred gene is sex linked. A rooster gets a copy from both his parents but the hen only gets a copy from her father.
So the first generation of a barred rooster over a non-barred hen, the boys will be split for the barring but all the girls will be barred. So you have to keep one of these roosters to get rid of the barring. But you have two choices on the hens.
You can put that rooster over the Jersey Giant hen. Half the offspring, male and female, will be barred and half will not. These are just odds of course not real results. I've had 4 out of 4 barred from this type of cross. What you actually get is just luck!
If you breed that rooster back to his sisters, all the boys will have barring. They'll get that from their mother. You really won't know if the boys have two barred genes or not. You can make a pretty good guess because the boys with double barring will be lighter in color than the ones split for the barring, but that is just an educated guess. You may hatch nothing but double barred roosters.
So if you keep the non-barred hens from this generation and mate them back to their father who you know is split for the barred gene, half their offspring, male and female, will be barred and half will not. This is the generation where you can eliminate all the barring.
Okay, this confused me a bit..

1st generation: all will be barred (boys split for barring)
2nd generation: (assuming you keep one male and breed back to mother) 50% of males and 50% of females will be barred. Keep an unbarred male if you get one.
3rd generation: Wouldn't none be barred if you used an unbarred male to breed the original hen?

:confused:
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,862
22,030
907
Southeast Louisiana
Yes, that works. Plus you can keep any of his unbarred sisters.

When you breed a split male to his unbarred mother, half the offspring, male and female, will not be barred. Keep only those.
 

Annie G

In the Brooder
7 Years
Nov 15, 2012
17
0
22
Linden, TN
Quite honestly, I'm not sure what my rooster is. He is big and beautiful, that's for sure and was told he was a rock. I will take a pic and see if I can post it here. I'm new to this. Anyway, I incubate eggs to raise chickens for meat but I'm really getting into this chicken and rabbit thing. I also raise New Zealand White rabbits. My plan on the chickens was to keep a rooster from this breeding and dress out the rest. Then, I will mate him with the pure Giant Black Jerseys. I also have an Ameraucana in the mix I want to start a line of. So I would want to do the same there. Of course if I can just find one rooster of each breed I could buy locally, I would.
 

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