Separating a Pair of Ring-necked Doves and Nesting

JKH

In the Brooder
Oct 9, 2020
15
17
27
Dear Dove Community,

Thanks for your help over the past year as I have become a dove owner, with many newcomer questions.

Sadly, I had to down-size my three doves to two, and returned a male (Snickers) to my breeder, where I hope he will be happy. He has become increasingly hostile towards me and too loud for my apartment. When I was near he would immediately move towards my hands to try mating and was relentless. It had become a problem and made my apartment a war zone, since he flew around like a missile.

At the same time, Snickers had partnered with my lovely young female ring-neck, Ginger, for three months and they had sat on a few batches of eggs, which I mostly switched out, except for hatching one male (Chippy) who is now a youngster.

When I returned Snickers last Sunday, I broke up the couple, and feel terrible about it. But it was either that or stop keeping all the doves. (Also, Snickers had started attacking Chippy, too.) By the way, all three doves lived in my spacious bathroom, uncaged, so there was space for everyone. (Everyone had their favorite perch.)

The same day that Snickers departed, Ginger laid an egg and now there are two eggs. So she is alone sitting on the nest, with the youngster nearby (and curious) but not helping out.

Do you have any advice for helping Ginger through this transition, as a single parent? Should I remove the two eggs entirely so that she does not have to care for them 24 hours a day? (Ginger does come off the nest twice a day to feed, though.) Do you think she will settle into a friendship or relationship with Chippy (who is her son)? I had read that doves are not averse to bonding and mating with their relatives.

Any advice you can provide to help Ginger along would be most appreciated. She is a lovely, peaceful, gentle and wonderful dove and I don't want her to be lonely or sad for long.

Thank you,

Jenna
 

Attachments

  • Untitled.png
    Untitled.png
    194.4 KB · Views: 18

JKH

In the Brooder
Oct 9, 2020
15
17
27
Hi Ron, thanks for asking. Three weeks have passed since Snickers was re-homed. Both remaining doves were gloomy and silent for a week. Ginger, the mom, has spent much of this time on the nest, with short breaks for food and water. Occasionally, Chippy (her juvenile son) will sit on the nest for a few hours in the afternoon. Ginger and Chippy (mother and son) have started to display some flirting and mating behaviours. Chippy will sit on the edge of the nest and groom Ginger's head and neck. They are also cooing to each other in the morning, as if to say "good morning." The eggs are not fertile (I swapped them out) and soon enough Ginger should realize they won't hatch (this has happened before). It will be interesting to see what happens next. Ginger is actually more forward in treating Chippy like a partner, and sometimes Chippy responds. Other times he defaults into baby behaviours and tries to feed from her beak at 5 months old. Overall, though Chippy as a teenager is more affectionate and attentive partner than his father, Snickers who was wild (like an angry sea gull) and had to be rehomed. I am hopeful that Chippy will mature into a really great friend and partner for Ginger. She seems willing!
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom