Starting a living privacy fence this weekend hopefully!!

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by gmendoza, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rock Hill,SC
    Asked DW [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] if I could make a living privacy fence from the native bamboo here in SC Phyllostachys parvifolia. I say its a great idea and have it trimmed to a respectable height of 7-8' every year.Im learing of Riozome management,and bamboo care.

    Your thoughts: [​IMG]

    p.s. I know its invasive,but only so if your too lazy to maintain it.
     
  2. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Bamboo is really pretty and sounds nice in a breeze. I have a couple smaller ones. It does take a little to keep it under control. A timber bamboo like Phyllostachys parvifolia is a little intimidating for my suburban backyard, but if I disliked my neighbors... [​IMG]
    BTW- Phyllostachys parvifolia is grown for its shoots, and timber. Consider it a crop, and eat it and sell the timber.

    Imp
     
  3. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Over here inSC they say its invasive.I say its a cash crop,and deserves to be on the Funny Farm.It will be on the East where we have the main artery street and South where there is a ugly field fencelines,hopefully to take over from having a need for a fence.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2011
  4. darkmatter

    darkmatter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use Juniper trees as stand alone and Japanese Honeysuckle on the fence line for a living privacy fence.
     
  5. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well we are using this type of bamboo because:

    Its readily available (just need to ask property owner of bamboo)

    Its free

    Its drought and frost/cold tolerant

    Thrives in South Carolina

    Its a mile from where we live.

    Can be planted near each other to form a resistable barrier/noise dampener.

    Good form of lumber.
     

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