Stopped laying 2 weeks after starting?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Hummingbird Hollow, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. Hummingbird Hollow

    Hummingbird Hollow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi folks,

    I have 2 Barred Plymouth Rocks, 2 White Plymouth Rocks, 2 Welsummers and 2 Black Jersey Giants, all 22 1/2 weeks old. My BPRs and WPRs started laying right on schedule at 20 weeks. I had three eggs on the first day and either 1 or 2 every day since. Because I've noted their favorite nesting places, I'm pretty sure that the BPRs are the ones laying smaller, creamy tan eggs and the WPRs are laying the slightly larger, more-pinkish, darker-tan eggs. (I'll post pictures when my daughter comes home and finds the cable to link camera to computer).

    After about a 1 1/2 weeks of equal production, I haven't found a BPR egg in about 5 days.

    In your expert opinion should I:

    A) Stop worrying, sometimes pullets start laying and then stop for awhile.
    B) Be concerned, this isn't normal. (If so, what next?)
    C) Start looking under bushes and other hang-outs (My girls usually get to free-range from about 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM every day)
    D) Other
     
  2. wsmoak

    wsmoak Chillin' With My Peeps

    They are usually pretty enthusiastic when they get started, so they might be hiding them... but it's also that time of year when there is very little daylight. Can you keep them locked up for a few days and see if you get eggs then?

    -Wendy
     
  3. johnsons-r-us

    johnsons-r-us Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Start looking under bushes! Mine did this. I kept them locked up longer....and they got the idea. Mine do lay different times during the day and two still like to play tricks on me. [​IMG]
     
  4. Hummingbird Hollow

    Hummingbird Hollow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for both replies. I'll follow both pieces of advice...look under bushes and in favorite hang-outs and keep them in their coop/run for longer periods (or even for a few days in a row) and see if they've been playing egg-hunt with me. It will be like Easter morning!

    I'll let you know what I find.
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Remember also that while some first year pullets are relatively unaffected by the dark, dark days of November thru January, others are. The choice of providing additional hours of light is entirely your choice, but it is one many people make to keep the eggs coming. Others, prefer to allow nature to just take its course.
     
  6. CindyJeann

    CindyJeann Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, my barred rock, when she first got started, layed 2 eggs for two days in a row then stopped for 2 weeks before laying another. Pullets can do this. But at the same time a large group of my girls were laying in "wild" nests untill I found them and raide3d them. Now they all lay in the hen house.
     
  7. upthecreek

    upthecreek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    did you say 'you changed them from free range to a pen' ? as this would be a good answer .
    Change in weather could cause it ................ also the feed might not be of the quality they need during weather or pen changes . The best quality food (no matter the cost) is allways the least expensive !!!!
    Best To You



    Quote:
     
  8. stormylady

    stormylady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 27, 2008
    Illinois
    Im going with A Stop worrying. LOL they started right at a time when most start slowing down, less hrs of daylight and not to mention its getting colder. I have 39 girls and all are really good layers, but they have really slowed down alot in the last week or so , so I went from almost a dozen and a half eggs a day down to 6 or so on a good day.[​IMG] I don't use the artifial lights to keep them going all winter but mine are pets also and I want them to be around as long as possible so I just let them do it natural like. [​IMG] But that being said it probably couldn't hurt to look for a hidden nest you might get lucky.[​IMG] Sandy


    Just read the post above me and Upthecreek makes very good points also.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2011
  9. Mother_Hen2011

    Mother_Hen2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 3 EE whom are laying.(not sure if all three are laying as I get 2 eggs a day but get 1 egg the next day.. Ive only seen 2 of them lay an egg so not sure about the 3rd. anyways lol getting back to the point.
    Combs and wattles all bright red?
    Showing any signs of distress?
    Eating and drinking well?

    Im sure they are alright they probably have a secret nest that you cant find lol [​IMG] Search high and low and keep them locked up until you get eggs [​IMG] than let them free range?
    Not sure but thats what i do. I dont let my 3 girls free range until after I find atleast 2 eggs [​IMG] No eggs no free range lol
    (Sounds cruel but they have a large coop with a large run lol )

    I hope that this helps alittle bit and if you could awnser those questions im sure some one much more experianced could help you out some more [​IMG]
     
  10. Hummingbird Hollow

    Hummingbird Hollow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fred's Hens :

    Remember also that while some first year pullets are relatively unaffected by the dark, dark days of November thru January, others are. The choice of providing additional hours of light is entirely your choice, but it is one many people make to keep the eggs coming. Others, prefer to allow nature to just take its course.

    I usually turn on the light in their coop when it starts getting dark (around 4:45 or 5:00) and then turn it off when I go up to close the pop door and take in their food and water later at night. This is as much to lure them indoors as well as so that find my way up there in the dark and count beaks (there is a big picture window in the front of the coop) as to extend their daylight, but it does mean that they do get more light than natural daylight.

    Here's a picture of the eggs from their first day of laying. I'm quite sure that the smaller, lighter eggs are from the barred rocks, since I saw one of the two in the nest box right before I came back out and found two eggs, one warm and one cold. The larger, darker one was in a different nest box that I saw one of the white rocks settled down in.

    [​IMG]

    I know that it is common knowledge that chickens lay eggs, but it still seems like sort of a miracle to me to go out and find an egg or two waiting for me every day.

    Thanks for all the advice...went on an egg hunt and didn't find any, but did discover that my mom (next door neighbor and co-chicken keeper) had gathered at least one BPR egg that I hadn't known about.​
     

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