Texas

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by allen wranch, Jan 13, 2007.

  1. Kilsharion

    Kilsharion Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 21, 2013
    Landstown
    My Coop
    ok, let me try this again...

    As currently worded: DMM Chapter 503 Section 14



    14.0
    Special Handling
    14.1
    Fees for Special Handling
    14.1.1 Fees
    Fee is in addition to postage and other fees, per piece. See Notice 123—Price List.

    14.1.2 Fee and Postage
    The applicable special handling fee must be paid in addition to postage for each addressed piece for which special handling service is desired. Except for official mail, the special handling fee must be paid at the time of mailing. For official mail, the special handling fee is collected under established reimbursement procedures.

    14.2
    Basic Information
    14.2.1 Description
    Special handling service provides preferential handling, but not preferential delivery, to the extent practicable in dispatch and transportation. The service does not itself insure the article against loss or damage. Special handling service is mandatory for material that requires extra care in handling, transportation, and delivery.

    14.2.2 Eligible Matter
    [1-27-13] Special handling service is available only for First-Class Mail, Priority Mail (excluding Critical Mail), Standard Post, Package Services, and Parcel Select (except Parcel Select Lightweight) pieces.

    14.2.3 Additional Services
    [1-27-13] The following extra services may be combined with special handling if the applicable standards for the services are met and the additional service fees are paid:

    a. COD.
    b. USPS Tracking/Delivery Confirmation.
    c. Insurance.
    d. PAL (for Standard Post or Package Services only).
    e. Return receipt for merchandise.
    f. Signature Confirmation.

    14.2.4 Bees and Poultry
    Unless sent at First-Class Mail, First-Class Package Service, or Priority Mail prices, special handling is required for parcels containing honeybees or baby poultry.

    14.2.5 Marking
    The marking “Special Handling” must appear prominently above the address and to the right of the return address on each piece for which special handling service is requested.

    14.2.6 Parcel Select - Nonmachinable Parcels
    The Parcel Select nonmachinable surcharge is not charged on parcels sent with special handling.


    As currently worded: DMM Chapter 601 Section 9 Sub Section 3



    9.3.2 Day-Old Poultry
    Day-old poultry vaccinated with Newcastle disease (live virus) is nonmailable. Live day-old chickens, ducks, emus, geese, guinea fowl, partridges, pheasants (pheasants may be mailed only from April through August), quail, and turkeys are acceptable in the mail only if:

    a. They are not more than 24 hours old and are presented for mailing in the original unopened hatchery box from the hatchery of origin.
    b. The date and hour of hatching is noted on the box by a representative of the hatchery who has personal knowledge thereof. (For COD shipments made by a hatchery for the account of others, the name or initials and address of the hatchery or the Post Office box number and address of the hatchery must be prominently shown for this standard.)
    c. The box is properly ventilated, of proper construction and strength to bear safe transmission in the mail, and not stacked more than 10 units high.
    d. They are mailed early enough in the week to avoid receipt at the office of address, in case of missed connections, on a Sunday, on a national holiday, or on the afternoon before a Sunday or holiday.
    e. They can be delivered to the addressee within 72 hours of the time of hatching, whether the addressee resides in town or on a rural route or highway contract route.
    f. The shipment bears special handling postage in addition to regular postage, unless sent at the First-Class Mail or Priority Mail prices.
    g. When live, day-old poultry is to be transported by aircraft, all provisions of the airline tariffs are met and air carriers have equipment available to safely deliver shipments within the specified time limits, allowing for delays en route in air and ground transportation.
    h. Day-old poultry, originally shipped by air express or air cargo and then presented for mailing, must be in good condition and prepared as specified in 9.3.2a. through 9.3.2e.
    i. Boxes of day-old poultry of about identical size, securely fastened together to prevent separation in transit, may be accepted for mailing as a single parcel, if such parcel is not more than 100 inches in length and girth combined.

    9.3.3 Small Cold-Blooded Animals
    Small, harmless, cold-blooded animals (except snakes and turtles) that do not require food or water or attention during handling in the mail and that do not create sanitary problems or obnoxious odors are mailable (e.g., baby alligators and caimans not more than 20 inches long, bloodworms, earthworms, mealworms, salamanders, leeches, lizards, snails, and tadpoles).

    9.3.4 Adult Fowl
    Disease-free adult fowl may be mailed domestically when shipped under applicable law in accordance with 1.7. Adult chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, doves, pigeons, pheasants, partridges, and quail as well as ducks, geese, and swans are mailable as follows:

    a. The mailer must send adult fowl by Express Mail in secure containers approved by the manager, Product Classification (see 608.8.0 for address).
    b. The number of birds per parcel must follow the container manufacturer limits and each bird must weigh more than 6 ounces.
    c. A mailing container must be used that is constructed by a USPS-approved manufacturer listed on the RIBBS website at http://ribbs.usps.gov.
    d. Indemnity may be paid only for articles that are lost, damaged, or missing contents, and not for death of the birds in transit if there is no visible damage to the mailing container.
    e. Postage refunds may not be available if the Express Mail shipment was delivered or delivery was attempted within three days of the date of mailing as shown in the “Date In” box on Label 11.
    9.3.5 Warm-Blooded Animals
    Warm-blooded animals, except the specified birds under specific conditions in this section, are not mailable (e.g., hamsters, mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, cats, dogs, squirrels, parakeets, and canaries).

    9.3.6 Mailed to the Pacific Islands
    Animals mailed to the Republic of Palau, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia require a permit issued by the government of the destination country.

    9.3.7 Bees
    Bees are acceptable in the continental surface mail when shipped under federal and state regulations to ensure that they are free of disease. Packages of honeybees must bear special handling postage, except those sent at a First-Class Mail price. Only queen honeybees may be shipped via air transportation. Each queen honeybee shipped via air transportation may be accompanied by up to eight attendant honeybees.


    Revisions Proposed



    [Revise the first sentence of 14.1.2 as follows:]
    The applicable special handling fee must be paid in addition to postage for each addressed piece for which special handling service is required by standards, or is requested. * * *

    [Revise the 14.2.1 by adding a new fourth and fifth sentence as follows:]
    * * * Items with special handling service receive tracking and when not presented at retail must include an Intelligent Mail package barcode prepared in accordance with 708.5. Any mailpieces containing live animals and including special handling must be presented at retail postal unit, a Business Mail Entry Unit (BMEU), or a Detached Mail Unit (DMU)

    [Revise 14.2.2 as follows:]
    Special handling service is available only for Express Mail, Priority Mail (excluding Critical Mail), First-Class Mail, First-Class Package Service, Standard Post, Package Services, and Parcel Select (except Parcel Select Lightweight) pieces.

    [Revise title of 14.2.4 and text as follows:]
    14.2.4 Bees, Day-Old Poultry and Adult Birds

    Special handling is required for shipments containing day-old poultry, adult birds and bulk shipments of bees (e.g. a queen bee packaged with an attending swarm), regardless of the class of mail purchased.
    [Delete item 14.2.6 in its entirety]

    [Revise the second sentence of 9.3.2 as follows.]
    * * * Live day-old chickens, ducks, emus, geese, guinea fowl, partridges, pheasants (pheasants may be mailed only from April through August), quail, and turkeys are acceptable in the mail only if:

    [Revise the text of item f as follows:]
    f. The shipment bears special handling postage in addition to regular postage.

    [Revise and reformat 9.3.3 to include a new last sentence, and a new item a and b as follows:]




    The following also apply:
    a. Reptiles (
    e.g. lizards, skinks, and baby alligators and caimans not more than 20 inches long) must be mailed by Express Mail, Priority Mail (excluding Critical Mail), First-Class Mail (parcels only), or First-Class Package Services.
    b. Amphibians (
    e.g. toads, frogs, and salamanders) must be mailed by Express Mail, Priority Mail (excluding Critical Mail), First-Class Mail (parcels only), or First-Class Mail Package Services.

    [Revise title and introductory text of 9.3.4 as follows:]

    9.3.4 Adult Birds

    Disease-free adult birds, weighing no more than 25 pounds, may be mailed domestically. Mailers must be compliant with all applicable governmental laws and regulations, including the Lacey Act, the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and any state, municipal or local ordinances. Mailings must also be compliant with the guidelines provided in USPS Publication 14, Prohibitions and Restrictions on Mailing Animals, Plants, and Related Matter, Chapter 5. In addition, each container or package must be marked as required by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under 50 CFR 14. Adult birds are mailable as follows:

    [Revise 9.3.4a as follows:]
    a. The mailer must send adult fowl by Express Mail, including Special Handling service, in secure containers approved by the manager, Product Classification (see 608.8.0 for address).

    [Revise the second sentence of 9.3.7 as follows:]
    Bulk shipments of bees (e.g. a queen bee packaged with an attending swarm) must include postage for special handling service. *

    We will publish an appropriate amendment to 39 CFR part 111 to reflect these changes if our proposal is adopted.
    Oh, you can read all that at these links, too:

    https://www.federalregister.gov/art...ds-for-live-animals-and-special-handling#h-14

    http://pe.usps.com/text/dmm300/503.htm#1064255

    http://pe.usps.com/text/dmm300/601.htm#1064884
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2013
  2. Turkchickistan

    Turkchickistan New Egg

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    May 24, 2013
    San Angelo
    Hi everybody from a hot and muggy San Angelo. I'm new to Texas since the beginning of the year. Love it so far just need to get used to the heat. Last week we got our order of 6 chicks and 10 turkeys which leads me to ask, would anybody in the area be interested in my packing peanuts? I have 5 black chicks with yellow dots on their heads looking for a home. We thought that maybe we could raise them for meat birds but they are the cutest and friendliest little pests who jump on your hand and act all excited to see you far more than my keepers. I just don't think we can do it. I'm also looking for a home for 5 teenage guineas, 3 hens and 2 males. They are semi tame and love to freerange. They do not like to be cooped up. They tolerate other animals but here they are being pestered by my one dog who follows them around and ends up splitting up the group causing hissy fits and my very large tortoise who believe it or not chases them causing them to go into spasms. The only thing I require is that they all go to a good home with a secure place to sleep at night. They are great at returning to their coop.
     
  3. Zootopia

    Zootopia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 13, 2011
    Abilene, Texas
    I have A couple of dogs, Fila Brasileiro, a large powerful guard dog who is a valued member of the family. We lost our 13 1/2 yr old last spring and got an 8 mo old in Oct. I forgot how much work they can be! He runs around the pasture like a banchee with the horse, mostly ignores the chickens. He does get interested when the roos spar or breed the hens, but he's getting there. He does Not like strangers!
    A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who does't have a mean bone in her body and only has 2 brain cells in her head. She loves everything, but is way too excited around the chickens. Loves to chase them but has never caught one, doesn't seem to be trying to. She's better off out front where the turkeys stroll and she's not too sure about something that big.
    Then there are the Chihuahuas. They are more likely to get bullied by the chickens than the other way around.
    We often have rescues here for evaluation and training. The chickens are great training aids.
    This morning when I drove in from work, the neighbors Choc Lab was standing at the pasture gate with the horse and a number of free range chickens. Some of their fence was damaged in yesterdays storm.
     
  4. GFamily

    GFamily Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 21, 2013
    Texas
    Well, I can only imagine when Elvis goes and we get a new pup how breaking him is going to be! Good luck good luck on your doggy adventure!
     
  5. taterdee

    taterdee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2013
    Fort Worth, TX
    I keep hoping to come home to that! Day 21 and not a single pip in 8 eggs. :( and I couldn't really candle them on day 18. They are green and so hard to see anything! But congrats on yours!!
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2013
  6. topdycke

    topdycke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 25, 2012
    Magnolia, Texas
    I have 4 Cavaliers and although cute they are lethal little hunters and have caught and killed several rabbits (and partially ate one). Nope they wont be near any chickens. Hope you get the fences back up. Always a project to do...
     
  7. RachaelS

    RachaelS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 14, 2011
    Austin, TX
    [​IMG][​IMG]That made me laugh!
     
  8. StudioBellaRose

    StudioBellaRose Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 29, 2013
    Wild Peach, Texas
    My bunts are all too young to breed right now but I should have some available in a few months. I'll try to get some pics posted soon but we are still in the middle of moving so I cant promise you when.
     
  9. Cockle-Dood

    Cockle-Dood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 23, 2012
    New Waverly, TX
    Take your time! Im not going anywhere!
     
  10. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    Just stopping in to post a few pics (yeah.. i need to take more...)


    yokohama chicks (blues)
    Just hatched out the other day.. second batch of the blues are incubating

    [​IMG]



    some of the newer chicks.. hatched out a few days ago.. leg banded at hatch so I can sort them all out later!
    (in the "holding brooder" keeping warm until they got moved to one of the bigger brooders)

    [​IMG]



    some of the ducklings also in a holding brooder .. most are muscovy.. The muscovy were a surprise hatch since the eggs arrived in such bad shape.. These are only part of the ducklings since the rest were still working on hatching

    [​IMG]


    2 of the goslings that hatched out last night

    [​IMG]

    Still have eggs in the bators..
    I have a little EO that has hatched (the only egg I set from our new girl), and a blue sumatra which is a surprise since the rest of the eggs (13 total) arrived cracked / broken / scrambled (seller refused to use proper packing in box)

    due to hatch next:
    red yokohamas, pekin ducks, then a large batch of ancona ducks
     

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