Thinking about culling all of my Leghorns

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ozark_chickies, Aug 28, 2011.

  1. ozark_chickies

    ozark_chickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are thinking about culling all of our Brown Leghorns. Everytime we let them out to free range they run straight to the hedge, and we don't see them again untill they go to roost. These birds have been wild and unfriendly since we got them as three day old chicks, and nothing has tamed them. They are almost laying age, and I fear they will lay in the hedge. So what would be a fair price for a breeding pair of crackhead chickens?

    edited to add: When you read hedge don't think nice trimmed 2 to3 wide, think privit hedge that hasn't been trimmed in maybe 60 years if ever. It is about 12 feet thick on my side, and the same on the other. Full grown trees, honeysuckle, sawbriar, wild grape, piosin ivy, more like a dividing thicket or tangle than hedge.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011
  2. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    For a quick sale and take a loss, five dollars a head.

    Never did like Leghorns myself even I had a doz of those girls but they were not too flighty like today's breeds. They are nervous but not overly paranoid.
     
  3. NellaBean

    NellaBean Graceland Farms

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    Sounds like they're smart chickens. Leghorns are an interesting breed.....not for everyone, I guess.


    But they're good layers. If they are at point of lay, this time of year.....advertise them as brown leghorns, free ranged, great foragers, nearing point of lay, should lay through winter, 8-10 each, discount for taking all.
     
  4. mystang89

    mystang89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I love leghorns myself. If I lived in Arkansas I'd buy a few of them from you to replace some of mine.
     
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Point of lay pullets, I'd ask twenty dollars each. Your price may be less, being in the south. Say ten dollars each? If you have roos, I'd market them as trios for maybe 30 dollars? Or sell the whole flock for one price. edited--I see you have seven hens and seven roos. I doubt you'll be able to sell all the roos, they're really not a meat bird. I guess you could try pairs for fifteen dollars? It really just depends on how much you want to get rid of them.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2011
  6. ozark_chickies

    ozark_chickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the suggestions. Just because I called them crackheads doesn't mean I don't like them, it's what DH started calling them as chicks, because they were so wild and flighty compared to the Dominques they were raised with. They are very beautiful birds, and they even sound different than my other chickens. If I thought I could train them to lay in the henhouse, instead of the poisin ivy, I would keep the hens and make dumplings with the roos.
     
  7. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Leghorns make up about 15% of my flock of 300, and I must say they are the best layers and foragers out of the whole group. I'm buying about 40 more POL leghorns from the local feed mill in a week for $6.50 each.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011
  8. wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can you put a nest box out by the hedge? Give them a place to lay an egg that you know where to look.
     
  9. lauriej57

    lauriej57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I lived close by, I would take them all!

    I usually have at least 2 in my flock of around 20. They are flightier birds, and they forage well, which is probably why they head to the hedge, they know where to get the bugs and things.

    I would give them a chance if I were you, once you suspect they are laying, or really close, starting to do the squat, combs and wattles really red, you can keep them in the coop for a week or two. They will normally start laying sooner than other breeds, so I would be expecting them to lay anywhere from 17 to 21 weeks.

    I've never had a problem with my leghorns not laying in the nest. Once they find the nest, and start laying there, they'll come from wherever they are to lay. Once they start laying, they will also become much friendlier. Mine are the first ones to hop into my lap, when I sitting outside in my lawn chair, always looking for treats, though they aren't the easiest to actually catch. I can pet them, but they are very alert, when my hands start tightening, they are out of there!

    I love my leghorns!
     
  10. zookeeper15133

    zookeeper15133 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know leghorns can be flighty, but my Americauna mixes were like that until they started to lay. Now theywill walk up to me for a pet or treat. Remember they are teenagers until they start to lay.

    To make a weatherproof nest by the hedge, just take a medium sized tote ( mine is all grey) Cut a door in it and drill vent holes across the top. I think I have 3 on each side and 2 on each end, maybe an inch. Pop the lid off to gather the eggs.

    Good luck on whatever you decide.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011

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