To wash or not to wash eggs? That is the ?

our girls12

In the Brooder
May 6, 2017
6
0
15
sometimes my eggs are disgusting. poop and sometimes broken egg so yolk and hay from nesting boxes stuck on them. I read not to wash eggs because they have film on them which helps keep out bacteria. I throw them away when they get dirty because I give them to neighbors but don't feel comfortable handing them something that looks so bad. Also some of my neighbors are English and keep eggs on the counter (not refrigerated). Any advice?
 

PirateGirl

Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist
Premium member
Mar 11, 2017
7,028
17,535
612
South Park, Colorado, USA
If they are really bad, I sometimes feed them back to the flock, but don't just throw them away.

I only give away the cleanest I have. If they are really dirty I either wash and refrigerate or wash immediately before consumption. If I wash them I tell the person they need to go in the fridge. If I know a person well I might ask if they mind the occasional dirty egg and just tell them to rinse with warm water before cooking. Surprisingly many people don't mind. My one friend was just thrilled to have fresh eggs and was like oh yeah I know, my mom has chickens, and she was fine with a dirty egg or two.
 

our girls12

In the Brooder
May 6, 2017
6
0
15
If they are really bad, I sometimes feed them back to the flock, but don't just throw them away.

I only give away the cleanest I have. If they are really dirty I either wash and refrigerate or wash immediately before consumption. If I wash them I tell the person they need to go in the fridge. If I know a person well I might ask if they mind the occasional dirty egg and just tell them to rinse with warm water before cooking. Surprisingly many people don't mind. My one friend was just thrilled to have fresh eggs and was like oh yeah I know, my mom has chickens, and she was fine with a dirty egg or two.
 

our girls12

In the Brooder
May 6, 2017
6
0
15
I do give eggs away that have stuff on them and I do tell the recipient of the eggs that they are not washed because they stay fresher but wash just before using. Its the really bad ones. for example yesterday it rained all day and the girls were out in the mud and then they go to lay and their feet are muddy and therefore the eggs that may already be in the box get muddy. not too mention there was a broken egg so yolk and hay all over them. I think I'll just feet the back to the girls instead of taking any chances. But would like to hear from others as far as their philosophy about washing and storing. Thanks so much.
 

Amy 4

In the Brooder
May 20, 2018
18
9
21
If they are really bad, I sometimes feed them back to the flock, but don't just throw them away.

I only give away the cleanest I have. If they are really dirty I either wash and refrigerate or wash immediately before consumption. If I wash them I tell the person they need to go in the fridge. If I know a person well I might ask if they mind the occasional dirty egg and just tell them to rinse with warm water before cooking. Surprisingly many people don't mind. My one friend was just thrilled to have fresh eggs and was like oh yeah I know, my mom has chickens, and she was fine with a dirty egg or two.
I really wouldn’t feed them back to your flock as they will get the taste for egg and maybe even start eating there own after they have laid them.
 

Amy 4

In the Brooder
May 20, 2018
18
9
21
sometimes my eggs are disgusting. poop and sometimes broken egg so yolk and hay from nesting boxes stuck on them. I read not to wash eggs because they have film on them which helps keep out bacteria. I throw them away when they get dirty because I give them to neighbors but don't feel comfortable handing them something that looks so bad. Also some of my neighbors are English and keep eggs on the counter (not refrigerated). Any advice?
I think what you are doing is for the best better safe then sorry
 

BeanTater

In the Brooder
Nov 24, 2017
14
22
44
I have found if I keep up on clean nesting material in the boxes & daily collection it really cuts down on dirty eggs. BUT sometimes they just get poopy. If they are really bad I pitch them. If its a spot or two I use a Scott's green scrubby to dry buff the "dirt" off. I have heard of using and paper too.
 

PirateGirl

Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist
Premium member
Mar 11, 2017
7,028
17,535
612
South Park, Colorado, USA
I really wouldn’t feed them back to your flock as they will get the taste for egg and maybe even start eating there own after they have laid them.
I have been doing this based on the advice of others on here. Scrambled eggs are often recommended as a protein treat for chickens and ducks and crushed eggshells may be a good calcium supplement in addition to oyster shell. I try not to throw much of anything away. I may re-evaluate if I ever have an egg eater, but crushed and cooked they aren't exactly recognizable.
 

21hens-incharge

Addict
Premium member
5 Years
Mar 9, 2014
16,511
65,534
1,412
Northern Colorado
I have found if I keep up on clean nesting material in the boxes & daily collection it really cuts down on dirty eggs. BUT sometimes they just get poopy. If they are really bad I pitch them. If its a spot or two I use a Scott's green scrubby to dry buff the "dirt" off. I have heard of using and paper too.
^^^^this^^^^

Keeping the nest boxes clean is important as is daily collection.

I also discourage hens sleeping in nests.

Making sure roosts are higher than nests takes care of that.
 

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