Valbazen Dosage?

dawg53

Humble
Premium member
11 Years
Nov 27, 2008
25,898
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726
Glen St Mary, Florida
Okay, thanks. I'll have to turn off my automatic door so they can't get out in the yard. Would it work to do it at night? I could do it in the morning, but i would have to wake up pretty early and get someone to help me since not all of my chickens are good with being held or touched (I've got three Sumatras and an egyptian who will scream bloody murdur if you try to touch them). Also, about giving them a little bit of food at a time, I just have my feed in two big feeders, so should I just empty them and pour in a little bit of food throughout the day? My coop isn't completely separated from the run, so would it be okay to just keep them in the run until they can free-range?
Yes you can treat them at night, just withhold feed for 24 hours prior.
You can empty the feed from the feeders into plastic trash bags and save the feed for later. Just give them a little feed at a time 4 hours after dosing, increase feed a little at a time. Then about 8-9 hours after dosing, go ahead and refill the feeders.
Keeping them in the run is fine.

Shortly after dosing your hens, you might be able to see tapeworm parts/sections, or "strings" of tapeworms excreted from your birds. If you dont see any, that means they have been absorbed in the digestive tract.
Keep in mind that not all your birds may have tapeworms, not like roundworms.
 

Ch8ckenhelp

Chirping
Nov 17, 2017
122
60
81
Yes you can treat them at night, just withhold feed for 24 hours prior.
You can empty the feed from the feeders into plastic trash bags and save the feed for later. Just give them a little feed at a time 4 hours after dosing, increase feed a little at a time. Then about 8-9 hours after dosing, go ahead and refill the feeders.
Keeping them in the run is fine.

Shortly after dosing your hens, you might be able to see tapeworm parts/sections, or "strings" of tapeworms excreted from your birds. If you dont see any, that means they have been absorbed in the digestive tract.
Keep in mind that not all your birds may have tapeworms, not like roundworms.
As long as its safe for them, I still wanna treat the ones who don't have it just in case it spreads around. Thanks for the advice! I'm not familiar with worming my chickens, so I had quite a few questions lol. I called my local TSC and they dont sell valbazen but they do have safeguard. If i have to, could I use that, since it is cheaper than valbazen?
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium member
11 Years
Nov 27, 2008
25,898
8,490
726
Glen St Mary, Florida
As long as its safe for them, I still wanna treat the ones who don't have it just in case it spreads around. Thanks for the advice! I'm not familiar with worming my chickens, so I had quite a few questions lol. I called my local TSC and they dont sell valbazen but they do have safeguard. If i have to, could I use that, since it is cheaper than valbazen?
I've used safeguard (fenbendazole) in the past against tapeworms without success. However safeguard is an excellent wormer against nematodes.

Just keep in mind that birds have to eat infected insects in order to get tapeworms. Not all birds eat infected insects, and not all insects are infected.
With nematodes (roundworms,) it's best to worm all birds. Birds get infected by picking up infected eggs from the soil.
 

casportpony

Enlightened
Project manager
Premium member
7 Years
Jun 24, 2012
88,004
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As long as its safe for them, I still wanna treat the ones who don't have it just in case it spreads around. Thanks for the advice! I'm not familiar with worming my chickens, so I had quite a few questions lol. I called my local TSC and they dont sell valbazen but they do have safeguard. If i have to, could I use that, since it is cheaper than valbazen?
One 125 ml bottle is less expensive than a 500 ml bottle of Valbazen, but you have to use a lot more, so it ends up being much more expensive.
 

ronkonkoma

Songster
5 Years
May 4, 2014
279
390
176
Long Island NY
I’ve never treated my birds and I’ve never seen worms. I know some people don’t ever worm their birds unless they see them, and some treat their birds a couple times a year just in case. Wondering what you all do?
 

coach723

Crowing
Feb 12, 2015
4,413
8,141
491
North Florida
never treated my birds and I’ve never seen worms. I know some people don’t ever worm their birds unless they see them, and some treat their birds a couple times a year just in case. Wondering what you all do?
I think the answer is very variable. I always recommend a fecal be done whenever possible to verify a worm issue, especially if one has never been a problem before. But many of us worm regularly based on our environments, our flocks' history with worms, and familiarity with the symptoms in our flocks. I can pretty much guarantee that at any given point within a few weeks of worming I will have a positive fecal for roundworms. My environment is loaded with them and reinfection is a regular thing here. Moving is not really an option, so I worm regularly and am very aware of the symptoms in my flock. Other people may have a very light environmental load and worming is not necessary nearly so often. Worms do not always show up in droppings, so not seeing them is not necessarily a clean bill of health. There are some that feel that a 'light' load of worms is not a concern so they don't worry about it. My understanding of how parasites live, feed, and reproduce convinces me that I don't want them in my flock, period. There really isn't any other species that I'm aware of where the recommendation is to let them carry parasites: not horses, cows, dogs, cats, goats, etc. If I didn't already know that I had a worm issue I would get a fecal done every 6 months and if they came back negative then I'd get one done annually, since that's the only way to know for sure. Either by a vet if that is an option, or by a mail in test service, which is about $25. That's just my opinion, and I know there are many different ones.
 
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