what color is my runner?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by animalloverabh, Jul 31, 2010.

  1. animalloverabh

    animalloverabh Allons-y, Alonso

    heres my runner - Bee and her 2 brothers or sisters (Mallorey and Fudgez) Bee is the one with white on her/him.
    can anyone please tell me what colour she is?
    i was thinking she might be a bibbed chocolate, but i dont think there is that color [​IMG]
    and do i have boys or girls?
    thanks

    Bee as a duckling of 4 days old
    [​IMG]
    Bee at 5 weeks old
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2010
  2. teresa-78

    teresa-78 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am not hot on colours but it does look like a chocolate, pic is abit blurry tho.. anyway how lovely is that duckling... so cute [​IMG]
     
  3. animalloverabh

    animalloverabh Allons-y, Alonso

    thank you, sorry about the blurry pic [​IMG] i put another one up so hopefully that one is better
     
  4. teresa-78

    teresa-78 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How cute, what great looking ducks you have... yeah chocolate bibbed I would say... but like you unsure about colours and if that colour exists, what a great looking duck though, maybe someone on here can tell you exactly the colour, but chocolate bibbed sounds good to me [​IMG]
     
  5. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looks to me like what happens when you cross a fawn/white with a blue--you get blue bibbed. If she's more chocolate than blue, perhaps it's "rust" which is a common "fault" in blue, or perhaps the same thing happens when you cross chocolate with fawn/white. It's my understanding, though, that chocolate is an uncommon color, so I would be more inclined to think it's just a rusty tuxedo blue (my coined name for a blue crossed with fawn/white).

    Whatever the technical color name, I do have a very simple name for that bird: Beautiful! [​IMG]
     
  6. Sweetfolly

    Sweetfolly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I'm pretty sure white patterns (Bibbed, Magipe, Pied, etc.) can be bred onto any color. You don't hear of them very often, but I'm pretty sure it's do-able. Also, It's I think it's pretty common for self-colored (Black, Blue, Chocolate) ducks to have varying amounts of white on them - they'll gradually turn white as they age too - there's a thread somewhere around here right now with pictures of ducks getting "age-white". [​IMG]

    Anyways, my vote is Chocolate on all three. They're really lovely! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  7. animalloverabh

    animalloverabh Allons-y, Alonso

    thanks guys for your lovley comments and info [​IMG]
    they had a trout as there mom ( not the fish sort LOL ) and chocolate for there dad so...a bit confused [​IMG]

    Mallorey (the last one at the right) , is getting a light color on top of her head that sticks out a little, would she still have it once she finishes feathering? would it be called a crest?

    so should i just call them chocs for now?

    `Alanna
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2010
  8. jrobertson

    jrobertson Robertson's Rare Poultry

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    according to storey guide to raising ducks: chocolate is extended black plus brown dilution. due to the extended black base, chocolate-colored ducks are affected by juvenile white and aging white in a manner similar to black ducks. i have some cayugas that have juvenile white and they look alot like the runner you posted as or the white on his chest. bibbed pattern is usually a little more clean cut than that.juvenile white is present in as much as 15 to 30 percent of the most carefully bred strains. i have a quartet of chocolate calls and only one hen is solid chocolate. the other three have a prominent white bib. i will try to line breed as much of the white out as possible. but these types of this are the norm when playing with genetics.
     

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