what kind of worm is this and what do I use?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by tofupup, Aug 16, 2014.

  1. tofupup

    tofupup Chillin' With My Peeps

    169
    14
    106
    Mar 7, 2012
    One of my sick hens crapped out these worms today. They are about 2-4 inches long and alive.

    I have Wazine and Fenbenzadole. Which one should I use?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,949
    74
    236
    Jun 28, 2010
    North Florida
    Yuck! I think wazine only get some. Look up Dawg58 and look at his posts. He is an expert on worming.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

    29,833
    4,064
    521
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Those are ascarids or round worms. Wazine will treat round worm, but fenbendazole will treat those and most of the other chicken worms that you can't see.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

    29,833
    4,064
    521
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
  5. tofupup

    tofupup Chillin' With My Peeps

    169
    14
    106
    Mar 7, 2012
    How awful! So by the time I see the worms in the poop, does it mean the hen is already irreversibly damaged? Is she going to die? Egg production has dropped about 70 percent in the last few weeks.

    How long do I give the Fenbenzadole to everyone -- 3 days? I read 3 cc's per gallon in another post.

    Also, there are 3 ducks who live with the chickens. Are they going to be harmed by the wormer? Can they drink the same water?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

    29,833
    4,064
    521
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    It's common to see roundworm--just treat at least twice a year. Fenbendazole should be given 1/2 ml by mouth to a normal size chicken (1/4 to a bantam,) once and repeat in 10 days. If you are treating certain hard to kill worms such as gapeworm or capillaria worm, then it is best to double the dose to 1ml, and give for 3-5 days in a row. Fenbendazole (SafeGuard goat wormer and horse paste, or Panacur) should not be diluted in water because it will settle out and the proper dosage will not be given.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2014
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    57,779
    13,941
    751
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    Three cc's of Safeguard in the water probably won't do much good, you're better off doing them orally.

    You can worm your ducks, too. I worm all of my birds (turkeys, peafowl, geese, ducks chickens and guineas) based on weight. Lately I've been worming everything at .2ml to .5ml per 2.2 pounds for 3-5 days. That works out to .5ml to 1.25ml for a 5.5 pound bird for 3-5 days. If I were going to do just the one day treatment I would dose at .5ml per 2.2 pounds and repeat in 10 days. That dose will treat roundworms and cecal worms.

    -Kathy
     
  8. tofupup

    tofupup Chillin' With My Peeps

    169
    14
    106
    Mar 7, 2012
    Thank you!!!! I have about 70 leghorns, all about 4 lbs. I've given about ten of them (the ones that look the worst) the oral Fenbenzadole dosage you suggested but does this mean ALL are probably infected with worms? Should I go through the barn tonight and pluck each bird off the perch and worm her, one by one?
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    57,779
    13,941
    751
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    That's what I would do. Curiously, are they molting? If they are, you aren't *supposed* to give Safeguard, but I do and haven't had any issues.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2014
  10. tofupup

    tofupup Chillin' With My Peeps

    169
    14
    106
    Mar 7, 2012
    Yes, some of them are molting.

    More worrisome, some of them have been diagnosed with Infectious Bronchitis Virus (via state lab blood test) so they are making horrible gasping noises. I have them isolated but I wonder if I should even worm them because I don't want to stress them out and kill them just by handling them unnecessarily.

    Or is it possible the worms are making them weaker and less able to fight off the virus, so I better worm them? They're not doing anything but sitting quietly in an isolation room, gasping and wheezing.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by