which is the proper way to decomb a rooster

chickbea

Songster
13 Years
Jan 18, 2007
2,181
16
201
Vermont
Quote:You are certainly safer to choose smaller combs. but it isn't essential. There are a few factors to consider - mainly your housing. As long as it is dry and draft free, chickens can tolerate pretty low temperatures. Moisture is the culprit for frostbite; you must have good coop ventilation. There are also a variety of other techniques people have used to keep birds comfy in cold weather - you can rub on vaseline or Corona or Poultry Rx (I also put that on legs).
 

Oopoo

In the Brooder
10 Years
Jul 10, 2009
99
0
29
Sparkles 2307

I read somewheres that you can put petroleum jelly on the wattles and combs to protect them. Sounds like a long winter
 

sparkles2307

Terd of Hurtles
11 Years
Oct 23, 2008
6,025
12
251
Northwestern Minnesota
Yeah no doubt!

We have good circulation, there are two large vents in the floor of the hayloft right above the coop. I plan to put square bales up in the loft, and around the walls of the coop, plus about 12 inches of straw on the floor to start and add as needed. we have heat lamps out there and the building is a grain bin from the 50's so its tighter than a drum except for where we purposefully put ventillation. I think I will try it this winter and see how it goes.

Sorry for hyjacking this thread!!! I have to say that I dont believe in dubbing unless its to prevent injury or due to frostbite.
 

Cuban Longtails

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Sep 20, 2007
6,026
30
263
Northeast Texas
Quote:Intentional conflict is illegal in the whole of the United States.

Dubbing, in my opinion, is not cruel. It can actually save the life of a bird in cases of frost bite infection. If a person chooses to raise a and show a breed that requires dubbing in accordance with the breed standard then that is their right. There's absolutely nothing wrong with it when performed properly.

If you do not approve of dubbing, why even post on a thread of that very topic?
 

vixchix

In the Brooder
11 Years
Apr 5, 2008
59
0
29
Illinois
Well, here's my two cent's worth: If someone has to ask instructions on how to remove comb and wattle, this person probably isn't the right person to be doing the procedure. Furthermore, I would say that this practice ranks right up there with debeaking as far as cruelty and torture caused needlessly to the animal. If a chicken has frostbite or an infection in the comb and wattles, I can certainly understand performing the practice as a way of saving the rooster. Otherwise, Why in the world would you want to do that to a beautiful, innocent chicken?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

Cuban Longtails

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Sep 20, 2007
6,026
30
263
Northeast Texas
Quote:The same reason tails and ears are docked on puppies. For looks.
Oh, and as I mentioned in my post above, it's required for exhibition in certain breed standards (i.e. Old English, American Games, and Modern Games).

Here's a very informative post in a different thread concerning dubbing: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=2486119#p2486119
 
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